DRUG-FREE SCHOOLS AND COMMUNITIES ACT (DFSCA) ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG (AOD) REPORT

2018 BIENNIAL PROGRAM REVIEW


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The Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act (DFSCA) and subsequent legislation require an institution of higher education (IHE) to provide a biennial program review of alcohol and other drug prevention programs to be eligible to receive funds or any other form of financial assistance under any Federal program, including participation in any federally funded or guaranteed student loan program. In compliance, North Central Missouri College conducts a biennial review in all even years.

Institutional Mission

The mission of NCMC is to assist individuals in our educational/business community to attain their goals through open admission, reasonable costs, progressive curriculum and services, delivered by a caring, competent staff in a safe, technology-rich learning environment.

Foundational Belief of NCMC AOD Programming

North Central Missouri College is a two-year community college that prides itself on being a small, tight-knit community of learners. Care and compassion for one another permeates the culture of the institution and work together to assist students and staff in reaching their goals and being productive members of society. The misuse and abuse of alcohol and other drugs have the potential to threaten the culture and goals. As a result, NCMC is committed to promoting individual well-being and promotion of healthy, productive choices.

Alcohol and Other Drug Policy

Policy- Alcohol and Illegal Drugs
In accordance with federal law, and as described in more detail below, NCMC has adopted and implemented a program and policies to prevent the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by students and employees.

Students
Students are expected to comply with local and state laws pertaining to alcoholic beverages, controlled substances and illegal drugs. In addition, the manufacture, distribution, sale, possession, consumption, use or transportation of alcoholic beverages, controlled substances and illegal drugs and/or possession of drug paraphernalia by any student on College property, at any college-sponsored student activity, or at NCMC approved classes, field trips or activities off campus shall be strictly prohibited. This includes possession of alcoholic beverage containers.

No student shall be in an intoxicated condition, which may be evidenced by disorderly, obscene or indecent conduct or appearance, while on campus or at a college- approved event off campus. No student shall furnish or cause to be furnished any alcoholic beverage to any person under the legal drinking age. Missouri under-age drinking laws and federal and state drug laws regarding the possession, use and sale of illegal drugs will be enforced through judicial referrals and/or reporting incidents to the Maryville Police Department.

NCMC will impose sanctions, consistent with local, State, and Federal law, for violations of NCMC alcohol and drug policies and the Student Code of Conduct. Sanctions may include a verbal warning, written warning, loss of privileges, probation, suspension, expulsion from the halls and/or campus, or imposition of a lesser sanction. Sanctions may also include classes, community service, referrals for appropriate counseling and/or referral to local law enforcement for prosecution. If a student is convicted of violating criminal laws regarding alcohol or drugs, they may be subject to civil action. Legal sanctions may include classes, community service, fines, prison terms, loss of driving privileges, and mandated rehabilitation programs.

Employees
The unlawful possession, purchase, manufacture, use, sale or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by employees on college property or at any of its activities is prohibited. Violations of NCMC alcohol and drug policies as stated in College policies or employee handbooks/manuals may result in disciplinary action including corrective discipline, counseling, (faculty) reassignment, verbal warnings, documented warnings, probation, suspension with or without pay, and discharge for employees and/or referral to local law enforcement for prosecution.

If an employee is convicted of violating criminal laws concerning alcohol or drugs, in addition to civil action, the employee may be subject to termination. Legal sanctions may include classes, community service, fines, prison terms, loss of driving privileges, and mandated rehabilitation programs. Failure to disclose previous convictions on a job application is grounds for termination.

More Information Regarding Potential Legal Sanctions
NCMC supports the laws and regulations of the United States of America, the State of Missouri, Nodaway County, and the City of Maryville as well as the counties and cities in which NCMC outreach sites are located. Each student and employee is expected to do the same. Applicable legal sanctions under state, local, and federal law can include: forfeiture of personal property and real estate, fines, revocation of driver’s license, probation, parole, imprisonment, mandatory minimum sentences, and deportation for non-US citizens. Conviction of a federal drug crime can also result in the loss of eligibility for Federal financial aid.

A Federal Trafficking Penalties table, obtained from the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (http://www.justice.gov/dea/druginfo/ftp3.shtml), is provided below: Federal Trafficking Penalties

Federal Trafficking Penalties for Schedules I, II, III, IV, and V (except Marijuana)

Schedule

Substance/Quantity

Penalty

Substance/Quantity

Penalty

II

Cocaine
500-4999 grams mixture

First Offense: Not less than 5 yrs. and not more than 40 yrs. If death or serious bodily injury, not less than 20 yrs. or more than life.

Cocaine
5 kilograms or more mixture

First Offense: Not less than 10 yrs. and not more than life. If death or serious bodily injury, not less than 20 yrs. or more than life.

II

Cocaine Base
28-279 grams mixture

Cocaine Base
280 grams or more mixture

IV

Fentanyl
40-399 grams mixture

Fentanyl
400 grams or more mixture

I

Fentanyl Analogue 10-99 grams mixture

Fine of not more than $5 million if an individual,
$25 million if not an individual.

Second Offense: Not less than 10 yrs. and not more than life. If death or serious bodily injury, life imprisonment.
Fine of not more than $8 million if an individual,
$50 million if not an individual.

Fentanyl Analogue 100 grams or more mixture

Fine of not more than $10 million if an individual,
$50 million if not an individual.

Second Offense: Not less than 20 yrs, and not more than life. If death or serious bodily injury, life imprisonment.
Fine of not more than $20 million if an individual,
$75 million if not an individual.

2 or More Prior Offenses: Life imprisonment.
Fine of not more than $20 million if an individual,
$75 million if not an individual.

I

Heroin
100-999 grams mixture

Heroin
1 kilogram or more mixture

I

LSD
1-9 grams mixture

LSD
10 grams or more mixture

II

Methamphetamine 5-49 grams pure or
50-499 grams mixture

Methamphetamine
50 grams or more pure or 500 grams or more mixture

II

PCP
10-99 grams pure or 100-999 grams mixture

PCP
100 grams or more pure
or 1 kilogram or more mixture

Substance/Quantity

Penalty

Any Amount Of Other Schedule I & II Substances

First Offense: Not more that 20 yrs. If death or serious bodily injury, not less than 20 yrs. or more than Life. Fine
$1 million if an individual, $5 million if not an individual.

Second Offense: Not more than 30 yrs. If death or serious bodily injury, life imprisonment. Fine $2 million if an individual, $10 million if not an individual.

Any Drug Product Containing Gamma Hydroxybutyric Acid

Flunitrazepam (Schedule IV) 1 Gram

Any Amount Of Other Schedule III Drugs

First Offense: Not more than 10 yrs. If death or serious bodily injury, not more that 15 yrs. Fine not more than
$500,000 if an individual, $2.5 million if not an individual.

Second Offense: Not more than 20 yrs. If death or serious injury, not more than 30 yrs. Fine not more than
$1 million if an individual, $5 million if not an individual.

Any Amount Of All Other Schedule IV Drugs (other than one gram or more of Flunitrazepam)

First Offense: Not more than 5 yrs. Fine not more than
$250,000 if an individual, $1 million if not an individual.

Second Offense: Not more than 10 yrs. Fine not more than $500,000 if an individual, $2 million if other than an individual.

Any Amount Of All Schedule V Drugs

First Offense: Not more than 1 yr. Fine not more than
$100,000 if an individual, $250,000 if not an individual.

Second Offense: Not more than 4 yrs. Fine not more than $200,000 if an individual, $500,000 if not an individual.

Chart Two- Download PDF

Federal Trafficking Penalties for Marijuana, Hashish and Hashish Oil, Schedule I Substances

Marijuana
1,000 kilograms or more marijuana mixture or 1,000 or more marijuana plants

First Offense: Not less than 10 yrs. or more than life. If death or serious bodily injury, not less than 20 yrs., or more than life. Fine not more than $10 million if an individual, $50 million if other than an individual.

Second Offense: Not less than 20 yrs. or more than life. If death or serious bodily injury, life imprisonment. Fine not more than $20 million if an individual, $75 million if other than an individual.

Marijuana
100 to 999 kilograms marijuana
mixture or 100 to 999 marijuana plants

First Offense: Not less than 5 yrs. or more than 40 yrs. If death or serious bodily injury, not less than 20 yrs. or more than life.
Fine not more than $5 million if an individual, $25 million if other than an individual.

Second Offense: Not less than 10 yrs. or more than life. If death or serious bodily injury, life imprisonment. Fine not more than $8 million if an individual, $50million if other than an individual.

Marijuana
50 to 99 kilograms marijuana mixture,
50 to 99 marijuana plants

First Offense: Not more than 20 yrs. If death or serious bodily injury, not less than 20 yrs. or more than life. Fine $1 million if an individual, $5 million if other than an individual.

Second Offense: Not more than 30 yrs. If death or serious bodily injury, life imprisonment. Fine $2 million if an individual,
$10 million if other than an individual.

Hashish
More than 10 kilograms

Hashish Oil
More than 1 kilogram

Marijuana
less than 50 kilograms marijuana (but does not include 50 or more marijuana plants regardless of weight)

1 to 49 marijuana plants

First Offense: Not more than 5 yrs. Fine not more than
$250,000, $1 million if other than an individual.

Second Offense: Not more than 10 yrs. Fine $500,000 if an individual, $2 million if other than individual.

Hashish
10 kilograms or less

Hashish Oil
1 kilogram or less

*The minimum sentence for a violation after two or more prior convictions for a felony drug offense have become final is a mandatory term of life imprisonment without release and a fine up to $8 million if an individual and $20 million if other than an individual.

Missouri Penalties

In addition to the information listed above, a complete listing of Missouri substances, how they are placed on the schedule and additional drug information, can be found at:
http://www.moga.mo.gov/mostatutes/stathtml/19500000172.html (Effective until 12/31/16) http://www.moga.mo.gov/mostatutes/ChaptersIndex/chaptIndex579.html(Effective 1/1/17)
Missouri drug regulations can be found at:
http://www.moga.mo.gov/mostatutes/ChaptersIndex/chaptIndex195.html

Student-Athlete Drug Use Testing Policy

A Student-Athlete Drug Use Testing Policy was approved by the NCMC Board of Trustees in August 2012, and the first random drug test took place in Fall 2012. The College continues to issue random drug testing every semester. For a copy of the Student-Athlete Drug Use Testing Policy, contact the Athletic Director.

Alcohol and Drug Abuse Information and Programs

The College assists in drug education and prevention programs to reduce the abuse and illegal use of alcohol and other drugs. First-time violators of the College’s substance abuse policies are required to attend a substance abuse education class as part of the disciplinary process. Specific information is addressed in the Alcohol and Drug Biennial Review, available on the Student Consumer Information page at: http://www.ncmissouri.edu/about/Documents/biennial_review.pdf or located in the Dean of Student Affairs Office. The College also provides education through dissemination of informational materials, educational programs, counseling referrals and college disciplinary actions.

Alcohol and Other Drugs Biennial Review

NCMC compiles a Biennial Review of the College alcohol and drug policy and initiatives. The Biennial Review includes: foundational belief, a review of policy, annual notification, goals, statistical reporting elements, enforcement/sanction consistency, AOD campus efforts, measured effectiveness of the policy and programs through a SWOT analysis, and identified improvements that can be made. The Alcohol and Drug Biennial Review is available at: http://www.ncmissouri.edu/about/Documents/biennial_review.pdf,
on the Student Consumer Information page at: http://www.ncmissouri.edu/hea , and in the following locations: Academic Resource Center (ARC), Library, Dean of
Student Affairs’ Office, Dean of Instruction’s Office, Dean of Nursing/Health Science’s Office, and the Human Resources Office.

Health Risks

Substance abuse may result in a wide array of serious health and behavioral problems. Substance abuse has both long and short-term effects on the body and the mind. Alcohol and drugs are toxic to the human body. In addition to the problem of toxicity, contaminant poisonings often occur with illegal drug use. HIV infection with intravenous drug use is a prevalent hazard.

Acute health problems may include heart attack, stroke, and sudden death, which can occur for first time cocaine users. Long lasting effects caused by drug and alcohol abuse can cause problems such as disruption of normal heart rhythm, high blood pressure, leaks of blood vessels in the brain, bleeding and destruction of brain cells, possible memory loss, infertility, impotency, immune system impairment, kidney failure, cirrhosis of the liver, and pulmonary damage. Drug use during pregnancy may result in fetal damage and birth defects causing hyperactivity, neurological abnormalities, and developmental difficulties.

Additional health risks can include:

Substance

Some Possible Long-Term Effects

Alcohol

toxic psychosis, physical dependence, neurological and liver damage, fetal alcohol syndrome, impaired judgment

Amphetamines
uppers, speed, crank

loss of appetite, delusions, hallucinations, heart problems, hypertension, irritability, insomnia, toxic psychosis, rebound depression

Barbiturates barbs, bluebirds, blues

severe withdrawal symptoms, possible convulsions, toxic psychosis, depression, physical dependence, impaired judgment

Benzodiazepines (Valium, Xanax, Ativan, Dalmane, Rohypnol) benzos, downers, sleepers, tranqs, roofies

impaired judgment, sedation, panic reaction, seizures, psychological dependence, physical dependence

Cocaine & Cocaine freebase
coke

loss of appetite, depression, weight loss, seizure, heart attack, stroke, hypertension, psychosis, chronic cough, nasal passage injury, hallucinations

Codeine

physical dependence, constipation, loss of appetite, lethargy, respiratory depression

Heroin
H, junk, smack

physical dependence, constipation, loss of appetite, lethargy, respiratory depression

Inhalants
ames, gas, laughing gas, poppers,
snappers

psychological dependence, psychotic reactions, confusion, frozen airway, sudden death

LSD
acid

may intensify existing psychosis, panic reactions, can interfere with psychological adjustment and social functioning, insomnia, flashbacks

MDA, MDMA, MOMA
ecstasy, xtc

same as LSD, sleeplessness, nausea, confusion, increased blood pressure, sweating, paranoia

Marijuana (cannabis) pot, grass, dope, weed, joints

bronchitis, conjunctivitis, mood swings, paranoia, lethargy, impaired concentration

Mescaline (peyote cactus)
mesc, peyote

may intensify existing psychosis, hallucinations at high dose

Methaqualone
ludes

coma, convulsions

Morphine
M, morf

physical dependence, constipation, loss of appetite, lethargy

PCP
crystal, tea, angel dust

psychotic behavior, violent acts, psychosis, hallucinations at high dose

Psilocybin
magic mushrooms, shrooms

may intensify existing psychosis

Steroids
roids, juice

cholesterol imbalance, acne, baldness, anger management problems, masculinization of women, breast enlargement in men, premature fusion of long bones preventing attainment of normal height, atrophy of reproductive organs, impotence, reduced fertility, stroke, hypertension,
congestive heart failure, liver damage, depression

Provided courtesy of the University of Washington.

Treatment Programs

There is no available on-campus counseling. Locally, counseling and referral assistance to students and employees who are troubled by alcohol or substance abuse problems is provided by North Central Missouri Mental Health Center (NCMMHC) and Preferred Family Healthcare. The Dean of Student Affairs can assist students in setting-up counseling services through an agreement between NCMC and NCMMHC. NCMC employees may seek assistance through the NCMC EAP program through Blue Cross/Blue Shield. Specific information is available for employees by contacting the Business Office or visiting the Blue Cross/Blue Shield website. Any member of the College community that is experiencing symptoms associated with their own or someone else’s alcohol or drug use is encouraged to seek help.

Annual Notification

AOD policy notification to all NCMC students and employees is made in the following ways:

  • Email
  • Provided on the Student Consumer Information page
  • Provided during Orientation, Advising, and Registration (OAR)
  • Provided as part of the Clery Report
  • Reviewed during new employee orientation
  • Paper copies are available at the Library, the offices of the Dean of Student Affairs, Dean of Instruction, and Dean of Nursing/Health Science.

Alcohol and Other Drug Program Goals

  1. Promote low-risk/no-risk choices regarding alcohol and other drugs
  2. Decrease number of documented alcohol incidents in residence halls
  3. Encourage students to avoid drinking and driving
  4. Promote the well-being of NCMC students and staff

Required Statistical Reporting Elements

The number of reported drug and alcohol-related violations that occurred on campus or as part of NCMC’s activities:

2015

2016

2017

Residence Halls

Drugs – 1
/Alcohol – 0

Drugs – 0
Alcohol – 3

Drugs – 0
Alcohol – 1

On-Campus/Non- residential

Drugs – 0
/Alcohol – 0

Drugs – 0
Alcohol – 0

Drugs – 0
Alcohol – 0

Off-Campus/NCMC Activity

Drugs – 0
/Alcohol – 0

Drugs – 0
Alcohol – 1

Drugs – 0
Alcohol – 0

The number and types of sanctions imposed by NCMC as a result of drug and alcohol-related violations that occurred on campus or as part of NCMC’s activities.

Year

Number of sanctions

Type of sanctions

2015

Alcohol

1

Loss of visitation, probation, alcohol class, community service, ineligible to represent NCMC at student conference

Drugs

1

Loss of visitation, probation, alcohol class, community service, ineligible to represent NCMC at student conference

2016

Alcohol

13

Loss of visitation, probation, alcohol class, community service, ineligible to represent
NCMC at student conference

Drugs

0

N/A

2017

Alcohol

1

Loss of visitation, probation, alcohol class, community
service, ineligible to represent NCMC at student conference

Drugs

0

N/A

The number of reported drug and alcohol-related fatalities that occurred on campus or as part of NCMC’s activities:

2015

2016

2017

Selby Residence Hall

Drugs – 0
/Alcohol – 0

Drugs – 0
/Alcohol – 0

Drugs – 0
/Alcohol – 0

Ellsworth Residence
Hall

Drugs – 0
/Alcohol – 0

Drugs – 0
/Alcohol – 0

Drugs – 0
/Alcohol – 0

On-Campus/Non-
residential

Drugs – 0
/Alcohol – 0

Drugs – 0
/Alcohol – 0

Drugs – 0
/Alcohol – 0

Off-Campus/NCMC
Activity

Drugs – 0
/Alcohol – 0

Drugs – 0
/Alcohol – 0

Drugs – 0
/Alcohol – 0

The number and type of sanctions imposed by NCMC as a result of drug and alcohol-related fatalities that occurred on campus or as part of NCMC’s activities.

Year

Number of sanctions

Type of sanctions

2015

0

N/A

Alcohol

0

N/A

Drugs

0

N/A

2016

Alcohol

0

N/A

Drugs

0

N/A

2017

Alcohol

0

N/A

Drugs

0

N/A

Assessment of Sanctions and Enforcement Consistency

Relative to other institutions, NCMC has a small percentage of students who have been referred through the judicial process for alcohol or other drug violations. The reported incidents are limited and usually involve multiple students. As a result, students involved in the same incident are generally sanctioned equally. Additional sanctions may be imposed for the host of a party.

Internal procedures and protocol also exist that allow NCMC to evaluate consistency in sanction decisions. Non-academic misconduct is tracked through NCMC’s complaint policy. An Annual Institutional Record of Student Complaints allows the College to track type of misconduct and the sanction imposed in order to evaluate judicial decisions and sanctions for consistency. The Dean of Student Affairs is currently exploring the use of Maxient software for tracking purposes, as well as Clery reporting.

In addition, NCMC has established an alcohol and drug protocols to direct disciplinary action. See Addendum A. The guidelines are followed, with only rare exceptions to allow for professional discretion.

Finally, the Director of Residence Life serves as the judicial officer for reported alcohol/drug violations in the residence halls, which has also established consistency in sanctioning. The Dean of Student Services serves as the judicial officer for non- residential alcohol/drug incidents, providing consistency for incidents occurring outside of the residence halls.

The effectiveness of sanctions is seen in a decrease in the severity of incidents.
Additional review is provided in the SWOT analysis.

Alcohol and Other Drug Program Inventory

The following items serve as elements in the NCMC alcohol and drug program:

  • NCMC is a tobacco free campus
  • AOD 101 and AOD 102 classes for students found in violation of our alcohol and drug policy
  • Focus on awareness with such programs as a safe driving program, use of “drunk goggles,” that also addresses distracted driving, the program is a joint effort of the NCMC Criminal Justice department, Residence Life Staff and the Local Law Enforcement
  • Student Athlete Drug Use Testing Policy
  • Orientation, Advising, and Registration (OAR) Days, which are required for all full-time, first-time students, includes topics related to consumer information (including the alcohol and drug policy), reviews security tips, student organization information, and student activities to encourage involvement and healthy choices
  • Alternative events are provided in the first three-weeks, including: a hypnotist that has become a regular feature and a poet, or spoken word artist, that promotes living a clean (alcohol/drug free) lifestyle. Activities are provided to establish involvement and connection to campus, while promoting alcohol-free choices
  • Driving simulator to mimic to driving while intoxicated and distracted driving
  • NCMC residence life staff is partnering with local law enforcement to conduct drinking/distracted driving educational programming as part of “Safety Week” each semester.
  • Safety week also has components to educate students and staff, about living a healthy life style, which includes: diet, cholesterol and nutritional information, healthy choices with regard to AOD, traffic safety and awareness, active shooter and other self-defense measures, safe sex, communicable disease information and other health issues.
  • Pledge trees – Students and staff were invited to pledge to not drink and drive or text and drive. The pledge to not drink and drive began in 2011 with texting added in 2012, and the program has continued successfully through 2017.
  • Cameras were installed in 2012 to monitor common areas for violations. Cameras can be viewed by the Director of Residence Life, Dean of Student Affairs, and both Residence Hall Coordinators.
  • Electronic card access to monitor entrance into the halls provides added security.
  • Guest sign-in procedures are in place to monitor residence hall activity
  • Alcohol-free alternatives – Campus activities/programs offered 2-3x week throughout the semester
  • Extended hours are offered at the Academic Resource Center (ARC), NCMC Library, and Ketcham Community Center (KCC) to offer students an alternative to off-campus parties. Extended hours at ARC and Library promote educationally-purposeful activities. KCC offers healthy, active options for students
  • Alcohol-free residence halls and campus
  • NCMC does not utilize alcohol industry sponsorship
  • Strong promotion of student organizations, with emphasis on those that apply to degrees
  • Resident Assistant training is provided regarding alcohol and drug prevention, alternative programming set-up, health and wellness, role- playing, confrontation, crisis intervention, and how to serve as a resource/referral.
  • The Residence Life staff invite the Trenton Police Department to lunch to discuss safety and security issues, as well as develop relationships
  • NCMC Wellness Committee promotes healthy lifestyles through programmatic efforts, such as Walk at Lunch, distribution of healthy snacks, health fair participation, and tobacco-free promotions including sponsorship of the Great American Smokeout.
  • HR distributes alcohol and drug information and provides information related to Points to Blue through Blue Cross/Blue Shield. Points to Blue promotes healthy lifestyle choices
  • NCMC provides counseling services through an outsourced, local provider (North Central Missouri Mental Health Center) and works with Preferred

Family Healthcare to provide Depression Screening, Suicide Prevention activities, and other programmatic options and resources.

Program Effectiveness/SWOT Analysis

North Central Missouri College utilizes the Part 86 Compliance Checklist, provided by the Higher Education Center for Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse and Violence Prevention, as one tool to check for compliance. A completed checklist is found in Addendum N.

A focus group consisting of NCMC Residence Life staff was also utilized to explore AOD efforts, including a focus on conduct, sanctions, and programmatic efforts. The conclusion of the focus group is that enforcement and sanctioning is consistent.

More stringent enforcement of the rules/policies has resulted in a greater number of incidents (or little change in the number of incidents) to report but the effect is that the severity of the violations has been reduced. The reasoning is that previously there were numerous minor instances that were unreported and only the most severe were written up, reported and sanctioned.  Additional programmatic efforts have also resulted in a decrease in the severity of incidents, although the number of students involved in sanctioning has not decreased. The group explored if the number of incidents increase or decrease in the spring. After reviewing numbers, it was discovered that spring numbers increase. It was hypothesized that this is due to a variety of reasons, including students becoming more relaxed about policy and procedures due to graduation, sports ending, familiarity with campus and each other, and students also becoming restless due to weather. Exploring student staffs vigilance and attention to upholding policies may also be a consideration and worthy of further exploration.

We revisited off-campus drinking by traditional-aged students and believe the incidents have decreased due to proactive approaches on the part of residence hall staff and coaches.
The student-athlete drug use policy, instituted in the fall of 2012, has been in place for four years now and while there have been no positive tests, it is believed that the testing has a two-fold effect. First, it acts as a deterrent to some who may otherwise use an illegal substance. In addition, it gives our athletes an additional excuse/reason not to use drugs when they are in a situation where peer-pressure may be applied. However, there is concern that the College needs to increase the frequency of testing and possibly the strength of the test.

Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT) analysis is also provided to assess program effectiveness.

Strengths
The KCC Director is leading the Wellness Committee
Student-Athlete drug use testing policy
Faculty have been encouraged to contact students who miss class
Guest escort policy
Surveillance and Security – Cameras in residence hall entry ways and parking lots, key card system and upgrades to resident door locks.
Electronic card access allows for additional monitoring
Number of staff in hall to oversee, program
Consistency in enforcing campus policy on campus
Significant athlete population in residence halls
Wellness Committee activities
Alcohol-free events and activities
The academic schedule offers core classes on Thursdays, and Fridays
Exams/projects increasingly require class attendance and academic responsibility
The campus encourages an increase in academic standards
Culture to encourage high levels of contact with students
Alcohol is banned on campus
Nursing students are required to receive drug tests
Involving President’s Cabinet and Wellness Committee in the development of the Biennial Review

Weaknesses
Cameras in the parking lots are not clear; difficult to decipher specific individuals Friday/Saturday on-campus options are minimal
Limited funding, no designated funding for AOD specific purposes

Opportunities
Trenton curfew minimizes off-campus incidents Limited bar options in Trenton
Good resources available within the state (other campus partnerships, service agencies, etc)
Alcohol industry sponsorship does not exist on-campus Positive relationship with Trenton PD
Continue to improve the Security and Surveillance system/camera system
Further utilize RA programing events to move forward the positive choices initiative

Threats
Significant commuter population and inability to enforce off-campus
Multiple drinking establishment open in the area – has pool tables and live music. Difficult to track off-campus incidents
Culture of drinking on college campuses State culture of unhealthy choices
Development of additional AOD-related products (alcoholic energy drinks, synthetic marijuana, marijuana laws becoming more relaxed, vapor pens – difficult to determine if an illegal drug may be in the pen)

Recommendations for Improvement

  1. Engage Bookstore in conversations about the sale of alcohol-related paraphernalia (wine accessories, shot glasses)
  2. Use of online OAR to provide resources to commuter and outreach students
  3. Continued enhancement of our prevention activities that have demonstrated effectiveness in preventing high-risk drinking or drug use
  4. More concerted effort in RA programming to promote low-risk/no-risk choices related to alcohol
  5. Utilize Wellness Committee for review of employee alcohol/drug policy and efforts focused on alcohol responsibility and drug-free lives.
  6. Continue to work with local Law Enforcement on programming.
  7. Work with local Law Enforcement to obtain a k-9 unit to assist in monitoring the residence halls.
  8. Continue to improve the Security and Surveillance system by reviewing camera angles to get the best views and keeping up with technological upgrades.
  9. Consider adding cameras inside the residence halls.

Addendums

A NCMC Residence Life policies
B Alcohol and Drug Protocol
C AOD 101 Agenda
D AOD 102 Agenda
E Interview Project
F Alcohol 101 Quiz
G First Step/Alcohol Awareness Quiz
H Alcohol Myths
I What’s Your Booze Q
J Who Am I worksheet and answers
K Student-Athlete Drug Use Testing Policy
L Athletic Drug Testing Consent Form
M Athletic Drug Testing Hospital Form
N Compliance Checklist

ADDENDUM A

Residence Life Policies/ Procedures

Revised 8/19/2015

Table of Contents

Guest Policy

3

Escort Policy

4

Quiet Hours

4

Discipline Policy/Guidelines

4

Sex Offender Policy/Procedures

6

Pet Policy

7

Incident Report

7

Prohibited/Approved Items

7

NCMC Bed Lofting Policy

7

Judicial Hearings

8

Common Area Damage

10

Appendix A: Overnight Guest Request

11

Appendix B: Bed Lofting Waiver

12

Residence Life

Student Conduct Policy/Procedures

The rules and procedures of the housing program are aimed toward assisting students in achieving the highest possible academic goals and socially responsible behavior. It is the philosophy of the Office of Residence Life that violations should be handled in such a way as to inform and guide students toward the development of personal responsibility.

Student behavior is expected to be lawful and in abidance with all federal, state and college regulations. Through the terms and conditions of the contract, housing publications and explanations at residence hall meetings, students should have a clear understanding of their responsibility regarding housing rules and expectations. Such rules apply to all residence hall students and their guests.

  1. Guest Policy
  2. The guest policy at NCMC is a privilege which is intended to enhance the social and educational life in a positive manner for NCMC students. Guest privileges are to be exercised with concern for others’ rights to privacy and safety. No student should be denied access to his or her room at any time. Students must sign in their guest with a member of the RA staff, beginning at 8 PM. There are no more than 3 guests per NCMC resident allowed to be signed in at one time.

    Violators of the guest policies will be subject to a written notice, formal charges resulting in the loss of guest privileges, monetary fine, and possible termination of Residential Life Housing Contract, at the discretion of the Residential Life Director.

    1. Guest Hours:

      Sunday-Thursday: 10 AM-Midnight Friday-Saturday: 10 AM-1 AM

    2. Overnight Guests

      Family members or friends of the same sex are allowed overnight stays under the following conditions:

      • Only Friday and Saturday night stays are permitted
      • Guest must be of the same sex
      • Resident allowed only one guest per night
      • Resident must complete a Guest Request Form (including roommate signature, if applicable)
      • Request Forms are due by 5:00 PM on the Wednesday prior to the weekend of choice
      • Request Forms are to be approved by the Residence Hall Coordinator
      • The Residence Hall Coordinator may deny overnight guest requests at his or her discretion. Denial may be based upon but not limited to:

        • The number of pre-approved guests for the particular night
        • The number of guests the resident has requested recent weeks
        • Previous disciplinary issues occurring with the resident or his/her guests
          *Overnight guests are subject to hall policies and are expected to conduct themselves accordingly. Guest can be dismissed at any time if these policies are violated.
  3. Escort Policy

    In accordance with the guest policy, each student that has a guest in the residence hall must escort their guest from the lobby door to their room. The guest must also be escorted by the resident at all times when they are in the residential area of the resident hall. It is the resident’s responsibility to make the guest aware of all policies and procedures. The resident is responsible for the guest’s conduct and behavior at all times while in the residence halls.

    1. Guests must be escorted during these hours:

      Sunday-Thursday: 10 AM-Midnight
      Friday-Saturday: 10 AM-1 AM

    2. Violations
      Violators of the escort policies will be subject to a written notice, formal charges resulting in the loss of guest privileges, monetary fine, and possible termination of Residential Life Housing Contract, at the discretion of the Residential Life Director.

      If the violating party (of any policy) is not a student at NCMC, he or she will be asked to leave campus, and the student of NCMC will be given a written notice and any formal charges in accordance with the discipline policy.

  4. Quiet Hours

    NCMC is a place of education, and a learning environment must be maintained at all times. Quiet hours refer to the amount of noise that can be heard outside of your room, with the door shut. A general rule of thumb, if it can be heard with the door shut, than you are subject to violating the quiet hour’s policy.

    Students in violation of the Quiet Hour Policy will be subject to be written up, and formally charged in accordance to the discipline policies in the Student Handbook.

    1. Quiet Hour Times:

      Sunday-Thursday: 10 PM-10 AM Friday-Saturday: Midnight-10AM

    2. During Finals Week:

      24 HOUR QUIET HOURS Apply Starting on Sunday of Finals Week and Continues Through the Entire Week!

  5. Discipline Policy/Guidelines

    The Resident Coordinator, through the Resident Assistants, has the authority and responsibility to uphold ethical and responsible behavior in the residence halls. Contact of Parents is at the discretion of the office of Student Services and residential life staff

    1. Misconduct subject to disciplinary penalties

      The following actions constitute misconduct for which students may be subject to administrative action or disciplinary penalties:

      1. Furnishing false information to a College official and/or forgery on any College documents.
      2. Failure to comply with direction of College officials acting in the performance of their duties.
      3. Any conduct that substantially threatens or interferes with the maintenance of appropriate order and discipline in the operation of the college, or any conduct on college property or in connection with a college activity which invades the rights of others.
      4. Any action which interferes with a student’s right to study, including but not limited to noise.
      5. Not having an escort in the residential part of a residence hall. NCMC escort policy states that males must have a female escort at all the times in the residential part of Selby Hall and females must have a male escort at all times in the residential part of Ellsworth Hall.
      6. Having alcohol related paraphernalia or alcohol container collections. Alcohol posters or displays in a residence hall room window.
      7. Holding any form of a sporting event (i.e., Frisbee, hockey, soccer, washers) or throwing any objects in the hallways.
      8. Consuming alcoholic beverages on university property.
      9. Being under the influence of alcohol while on college property or in connection with a college activity.
      10. Lewd, indecent, or obscene conduct or expression on college property, or in connection with a college activity.
      11. Any vandalism or destruction of college property.
      12. Having a guest of the opposite sex in your residence hall during restricted hours

        Restricted Hours for Ellsworth/Selby Hall:
        Sunday-Thursday: Midnight – 10 AM Friday-Saturday: 1 AM – 11 AM

      13. Having an open flame in your room. Items such as these and other prohibited items can be found in section VIII (Prohibited Items) of this document. Smoking in a residence hall is prohibited.
      14. Having alcohol in your room, in a residence hall, on any college property or at a college activity. STUDENTS SHOULD REMEMBER THAT NCMC IS AN ALCOHOL-FREE CAMPUS.
      15. Physical abuse of any person or conduct that threatens or endangers the health or safety of any person on college property or at a college sponsored event.
      16. Theft or attempted theft of, or the unauthorized use or possession of, or the unauthorized exertion of control over, or causing damage to property of any kind belonging to the college, a member of the college community, a campus visitor, or a person or agency participating in a college activity, or possession of any stolen property.
      17. Unauthorized entry or access to, or unauthorized use or occupancy of, any college property including without limitations lands, buildings, structures, steam tunnels, telecommunications, computer or data processing equipment, programs, systems, or software, or other facilities or services connected with a college activity.
      18. Tampering with, stealing, or damaging mail, mailboxes or any other mail-related items.
      19. Conduct or expression on college property or in connection with a college activity that is intended to threaten, to abuse, or to harass a person or group of people on the basis of race, religion, color, sex, sexual orientation, age, national origin, handicap, or status as a disabled or Vietnam era veteran.
      20. The possession of firearms or other deadly or dangerous weapons on college property or in connection with a college activity.
      21. Possession of drug and/or narcotic paraphernalia or drug and/or narcotic related paraphernalia displays except as expressly permitted by law.
      22. Use, possession, or distribution of narcotics and/or dangerous drugs except as expressly permitted by law.
      23. The possession or use of fireworks, gunpowder, bullets, and other chemicals or materials used to create an explosion or an explosive mixture.
      24. Obstruction or disruption of any college activity or inciting, aiding, or encouraging other persons to engage in such conduct. If substantial obstruction or disruption is threatened or occurs, the Dean of Student Services, or her/his designee, may issue a disciplinary suspension warning.
      25. Misuse of the fire alarm system, sounding of a false alarm, or tampering with other safety equipment such as fire extinguishers and smoke detectors.
      26. Committing rape or sexual assault on or off campus.
      27. Encouraging or watching rape or sexual assault on or off campus.
      28. Being present in a room where a violation is taking place or your affiliation with a group that is violating one of these standards. Guests who violate university policy may be asked to leave NCMC property or an activity. Students are responsible for the conduct of their guests.

        * The aforementioned list of actions that are considered misconduct by NCMC is not all-inclusive. Misconduct can include activities not listed here.

      Disciplinary action is at the discretion of the office of student Services and residential life staff.

  6. Sex Offender Policy/Procedure
    1. Any student who must register as a Sex Offender is prohibited from living on-campus in a residence hall.
    2. Procedure: If a student has not signed up for a room, they will not be allowed to select a room or sign a room contract.

      If the student is on the registry and has signed a contract but the academic year is not in session, they will be notified that their contract is now null and void.

      If the student is on the registry, living in the residence halls and the academic year is in session, the student will be notified that their contract is no longer in effect. They will be asked to leave the residence halls immediately. There will be no refund on the room.

      If the student appeals the violation, that person will be asked to vacate the halls immediately and not return until an appeal is granted and the student is found to not be in violation of the policy.

  7. Pet Policy
    Students may have non-poisonous fish only. Aquariums are to be 5 gallons or smaller. No amphibious animals, reptiles, turtles etc. Service animals are also allowed but no comfort pets.
  8. Incident Reports

    A documented written charge which indicates that the student has not responded to informal discussions about behavior or that the offense is serious enough to initially require more than a verbal warning. The written warning is documented by the filing of an incident report by the staff member involved. At the incident report level:

    1. A record of the incident report will be made by the Resident Assistant, Resident Coordinator or the Director of Residence Life, and a copy is kept in the Student’s file.
    2. A student will be issued a copy of the incident report.
  9. Prohibited/Approved Items
    1. APPROVED APPLIANCES.

      Students may have the following within their room: popcorn poppers, coffeepots with auto shut off feature, a mini/small refrigerator less than 4.6 cubic feet, mini microwaves less than 1.6 cubic feet and maximum 1200 watts, or microwave-refrigerator combination. All appliances must be UL-approved. (one refrigerator per student only)

    2. PROHIBITED ITEMS

      Candles, incense, fragrance warmers (ex. pads, pots and plug-ins), halogen lamps, octopus lamps, kerosene lamps, dartboards, hot plates, open‐coil heaters and cooking elements, drug paraphernalia, non‐NCMC installed A/C units, ceiling fans, any item described in the weapons section of the NCMC Handbook.

    3. HOLIDAY DECORATIONS

      Fire and safety rules stipulate that these must not hang from or touch any light fixtures or fire safety equipment. Only three strands of lights can be linked together per electrical outlet, and live holiday trees are not permitted. Decorations should not block doorways or windows. Any organic materials used for holiday decorations (ex. pumpkins / jack‐o‐lanterns) must be disposed of in a timely manner to avoid damage due to decay.

  10. NCMC Bed Lofting Policy

    In all residence halls, a bed is provided. It is recommended that you use only the bed/mattress provided by NCMC. If you choose to provide your own lofted bed, NCMC assumes no liability and you are fully responsible for any injury or damages that may occur.

    A loft bed is any temporary structure or device that is intended to elevate a single sleeping surface from floor level so that it creates additional floor space in a room.

    • If you choose to provide your own lofted bed, the structure must follow these minimum standards: Be no more than 40” wide, 88” long and 86” tall.
    • It must be able to accommodate our mattress which is 80” x 36”;
    • Be no more than 70 inches from the floor to the top of the sleeping surface;
    • Be freestanding; Not be attached to any wall, ceiling, or furniture;
    • Have a ladder made of metal or wood construction (other furniture may not be used as a step stool);
    • Be constructed of metal or wood. Fabric cannot be suspended from or around the loft;
    • Not restrict exit from any portion of the room or be a safety hazard to persons walking around the room;
    • Allow the door to open perpendicular to the door opening, and at least 22 inches must be allowed for exiting from any interior room arrangement.
    • A guard rail is recommended but not required.
    • All furniture issued by NCMC but not in use must remain and be stored in the room at all times.
    • The Residence Life staff reserve the right to deem a loft bed unsafe or in violation of fire code. Failure to remove or modify the loft may result in an immediate $50 fine and an additional charge of $50 per day for each day until compliance is met.
    • At the time of check-out all material and furniture not issued by NCMC must be removed and all NCMC furniture including beds and mattresses must be properly reassembled before residents check out. If the resident fails to reassemble the room they will be assessed an improper checkout fine.
  11. Judicial Hearings

    Any student that is alleged to commit a violation will result in a formal judicial hearing, unless waived by the student in written form. The Dean of Student Services, or designee, is the primary officer/hearing officer in cases of nonacademic misconduct, as it pertains to the Residence Halls.

    1. Notice of a Hearing
      • Date, time, place and nature of the hearing.
      • The particular sections of this Student Code of Conduct involved.
      • The fact that the student is entitled to an advisor of his/her choice.
    2. Hearing Procedures

      The hearing officer shall discuss the charges with the student(s) accused with committing the offense in an effort to determine responsibility. Students charged with a violation are required to attend the hearing as requested.

      The students are given the opportunity to present his/her position, explanations, and evidence concerning the charges. They may request the attendance of a witness by submitting a list at least three (3) days prior to the hearing. The hearing officer may also request witnesses having personal knowledge of the alleged misconduct.

      A student who would like to have an advisor at the hearing must notify the Dean of Student Services, or designee at least three (3) business days prior to the hearing. The student may confer with the advisor, but the advisor will not be allowed to address the judicial officer, any witnesses, or speak on behalf of the student. In addition, the advisor should keep the following in mind: The hearing process is not a court of law. It is not obligated to follow the formal rules of evidence and procedure. Academic decorum requires an advisor to play a different and more limited role that in the court.

    3. Findings and Decision

      The hearing officer shall issue a decision and impose sanctions if warranted. The hearing officer reserves the right to postpone a decision if additional information is needed. The student will be notified of the decision within ten (10) business days after a decision has been made. A student found responsible for a violation of the Student Code of Conduct is entitled to an appeal and should follow the guidelines provided in the student handbook.

    4. Hearings by Mail

      The Dean of Student Services or designee has the authority to settle matters via mail, when classes are not in session or when it is determined by the Dean that the student cannot attend due to extenuating circumstances. In this instance, the hearing officer will contact the student via a certified letter within ten (10) business days of receipt of the incident report, and allow the student to respond to the charges within a reasonable time. The student can respond to the charges, either in written form or by scheduling a meeting by the deadline provided in the letter.

      If the student chooses not to respond or a response is provided in written form, a determination of responsibility will be made by the hearing officer based on the information provided. At that time, the hearing officer may impose appropriate sanctions. The Dean of Student Services, or designee, shall have the power and jurisdiction to order any student to cease and desist from any activity that is judged disruptive to the institution’s operation.

      If the student fails to cease and desist from such activity, the Dean of Student Services, or designee, after discussing the matter with the student, may immediately suspend the student for a period of time not to exceed ten (10) business days, pending a formal hearing. Appeals should follow the procedures outlined in C, “Appeals for both Academic and Non-Academic Misconduct”

    5. Appeal Process
      1. Student meets with their Hall Coordinator;
      2. Student appeals to appropriate Dean;
      3. Student appeals to Vice President of Instruction/Student Services;
      4. Student appeals to Student Appeals Committee;
      5. Student makes final appeal to College President.
    6. The Dean of Instruction/Dean of Allied Health is the administrative officer in cases of academic misconduct. Grade appeals follow a different procedure, which is outlined in the “Grade Appeals” section. Each instructor is assigned jurisdiction for class conduct and grades. Charges of academic misconduct should follow one of these options:

      1. Provide timely written notice to the student of the suspected academic misconduct and invite the student to discuss the matter. Advise the student in writing within ten (10) business days, after such notification and/or personal meeting, of the decision and penalties imposed and the student’s right to appeal, in writing, to the Dean of Instruction/Dean of Allied Health within ten (10) business days. Copies of this action shall be sent to the Dean of Instruction/Dean of Allied Health.
      2. Submit a written appeal to the Dean of Instruction/Dean of Allied Health for adjudication. The Dean or designated agent shall investigate the charges. In conducting the investigation, the agent shall discuss the charges with the student(s) in question and with other students who have personal knowledge of the alleged misconduct to determine whether it is reasonable to believe the charges are true. The Dean of Instruction/Dean of Allied Health shall provide a timely, written notice to the student of the decision and penalties imposed.
      3. Subsequent appeals should follow the guidelines outlined in “C“ in the Student Handbook which outlines policy for “Appeals for both Academic and Non-Academic Misconduct”
      4. Items that should be contained within a discipline file for each incident:
        • Incident Report
        • Hearing Notification Letter
        • Hearing Follow-Up Letter

        If Applicable:

        • Hearing Detail
        • Returned Waiver Form
        • Appeal Letter
  12. Common Area Damage
    Common Area Damage is defined as damage that occurs in common/public areas in and around the halls. Damage would not be defined as normal wear and tear, but misuse, abuse or vandalism.

    When these damages occur, an incident report will be filed. The Student Damage Review Board (SDRB) will decide on the assessment of fees to the residents.

    The SDRB is a function of the Residents Hall Association (RHA) and serves a judicial board responsible for ruling on common area damage in both Selby and Ellsworth Halls. Details concerning the responsibilities and procedures can be found in the RHA constitution and by-laws.

    Appendix A:

    NCMC Residence Life Overnight Guest Request Form

    Name:


    Date:   


    Hall & Room #:


    Phone #:


    Requested Overnight Guest:


    Phone#                                 


    Date Requested (Fri. and/or Sat. Only):


    I understand that I will be responsible for my guest’s actions during his or her stay on NCMC’s campus. I also understand that my overnight guest is subject to hall policies and can be dismissed at any time if these policies are violated.
    Signature:


    Date:


    You must obtain the following signatures by the Wednesday prior to your guest’s visit at 5:00PM. ALL overnight guest stays must be approved by your roommate, RA and Residence Life Coordinator.

    • Roommate Signature:

      Date:    


    • RA Signature:

      Date:              


    • Coordinator Signature:

      Date:          


    Approved Date:


    Denied Date:


    Return form to your Residence Life Coordinator.
    You will receive a copy of this form stating that your request has been approved or denied.
    Any questions, please contact Selby Dorm Director at x1480, or Ellsworth Dorm Director at x1470.
    You may also appeal this decision with your Residence Hall Director at x1412

    Any overnight guest staying on campus without approval will result in disciplinary action, as well as possible denial of future requests.

    Appendix B:

    Bed Lofting Waiver Form

    Whether purchased, rented, home-made or provided by the Department of Residence Life, all residents using lofts in the residence halls must sign a Release and Waiver of Liability form. This form must be attached to the Residence Hall Room Condition Report that you will complete and sign at the time you check-in. The form reads as follows:
    In accordance with the Residence Hall Policy Handbook, residents using lofts whether or not provided by the Department of Residence Life are required to sign the following liability waiver form. Failure to sign the form and/or meet the minimum construction requirements will require you to use ONLY a North Central Missouri College (NCMC) -issued regular bed and mattress.
    I,                                                                                    (please print first and last name), wish to use a loft. Therefore, in return for permission to use such a loft or bunk, I agree to the following:

    1. That my loft will conform to the minimum requirements described in the current Residence Hall Policy Handbook.
    2. That I understand my failure to use a guard rail or ladder is dangerous and unsafe and I ASSUME THE RISK of injury or death from such failure.
    3. That I do hereby RELEASE, WAIVE, DISCHARGE, AND COVENANT NOT TO SUE North Central Missouri College; the Department of Residence Life; the Board of Trustees, State of Missouri, or it’s officers, servants, agents, or employees, (hereinafter referred to as RELEASEES) for any liability, claim, and/or cause of action arising out of or related to any loss, damage, or injury, including death, that may be sustained by me, or to any property belonging to me arising out of use of a loft or bunk bed while living in Residence Halls at NCMC.
    4. That this Release shall be effective whether injury is caused by my negligence, the negligence of the RELEASEES, or the negligence of any third party.

    Signature of Resident:


    Date:


    Approved   Denied

    Signature of Resident Hall Coordinator


    Date


    Revised: 7/1/2015

    ADDENDUM B

    RESIDENCE LIFE

    Alcohol and Other Drugs – Policy/Procedures PROTOCOL
    Each incident pertaining to or involving alcohol and/or intoxication will be treated on a case by case basis allowing consideration of all circumstances specific to each case. The following are sanctioning guidelines specific to each rule violation. As each violation will be treated on a case by case basis the guidelines will direct but not limit disciplinary actions.

    Violation of Residence Hall Section IV-6: Having alcohol related paraphernalia or alcohol container collections or displays in a room, residence hall, or on campus.

    1st Offense:
    Removal of material
    Verbal Warning (noted in file) – in accordance with NCMC policy/procedures. Written Warning – optional
    Loss of Privileges – optional Community Service: 0 – 5 hours
    AOD 101: None
    Counseling: None
    2nd Offense:
    Removal of material
    Written Warning – in accordance with NCMC policy/procedures. Loss of privileges/probation – optional
    Community Service: 0 – 10 hours
    AOD 101: (optional) Counseling: None
    3rd Offense:
    Removal of material
    Loss of privileges / probation – optional Community Service: minimum 5 – 15 hours AOD 101: (mandatory)
    Counseling: Optional
    Violation of Section IV-8: Consuming alcoholic beverages on college property.
    1st Offense:
    Removal of all substances and containers Written documentation – mandatory Loss of privileges / probation – mandatory Community Service: 0 – 15 hours
    AOD 101: (mandatory) Counseling: Optional
    2nd Offense:
    Removal of all substances and containers Written documentation – mandatory Loss of privileges / probation – mandatory
    Community Service: minimum10 – 25 hours AOD: 102 (mandatory)
    Counseling: Optional Removal from Halls: Optional Expulsion: Optional
    3rd Offense:
    Removal of all substances and containers Written documentation – mandatory Loss of privileges / probation – mandatory
    Community Service: minimum10 – 25 hours Counseling: Recommended
    Removal from Halls: Mandatory Expulsion: Optional
    Violation of Section IV-9: Being under the influence of alcohol on college property or in connection with a college activity.
    1st Offense:
    Verbal Warning – (noted in file) in accordance with NCMC policy/procedures. Written documentation – optional.
    Loss of privileges / probation – optional Community Service: 0 – 15 hours
    AOD 101: (optional) Counseling: Optional
    2nd Offense:
    Written documentation – mandatory
    Loss of privileges / probation – mandatory Community Service: minimum 0 – 15 hours AOD 101: (mandatory) 102 (optional) Counseling: Optional
    Removal from Halls: Optional
    3rd Offense:
    Loss of privileges / probation – mandatory Community Service: minimum 10 – 25 hours AOD 102: (mandatory)
    Counseling: Recommended Removal from Halls: Optional Expulsion: Optional
    Violation of Section IV-14: Having alcohol in your room, in a residence hall, on any college property or at a college activity.
    1st Offense:
    Removal of all substances and containers Written Documentation – mandatory
    Loss of privileges / probation – mandatory Community Service: 0 – 15 hours
    AOD 101: (mandatory) 102 (optional) Counseling: Optional
    Removal from Halls: Optional Expulsion: Optional
    2nd Offense:
    Removal of all substances and containers Written Documentation – mandatory
    Loss of privileges / probation – mandatory Community Service: minimum10 – 25 hours AOD 102: (mandatory)
    Counseling: Recommended Removal from Halls: Optional Expulsion: Optional
    3rd Offense:
    Removal of all substances and containers Written Documentation – mandatory
    Loss of privileges / probation – mandatory Community Service: minimum15 – 50 hours Counseling: Recommended
    Removal from Halls: Mandatory Expulsion: Optional
    Violation of Residence Hall Section IV-21: Possession of drug and/or narcotic paraphernalia or drug and/or narcotic related paraphernalia displays except as expressly permitted by law.
    1st Offense:
    Removal of material
    Written Warning – in accordance with NCMC policy/procedures. Loss of privileges/probation – optional
    Community Service: 0 – 10 hours
    AOD 101: (optional) Counseling: None
    2nd Offense:
    Removal of material
    Loss of privileges / probation – optional Community Service: minimum 5 – 15 hours AOD 101: (mandatory)
    Counseling: Optional
    3rd Offense:
    Removal of all material
    Written Documentation – mandatory
    Loss of privileges / probation – mandatory Community Service: minimum15 – 50 hours Counseling: Recommended
    Removal from Halls: Optional Expulsion: Optional
    Violation of Section IV-22: Use, possession, or distribution of narcotics and/or dangerous drugs except as expressly permitted by law.
    1st Offense:
    Removal of all substances and paraphernalia Involvement of local authorities – Optional Written documentation – mandatory
    Loss of privileges / probation – mandatory Community Service: 0 – 15 hours
    AOD 101: (mandatory) Counseling: Optional
    2nd Offense:
    Removal of all substances and paraphernalia Involvement of local authorities – Mandatory Loss of privileges / probation – mandatory Community Service: minimum10 – 25 hours AOD: 102 (mandatory)
    Counseling: Optional Removal from Halls: Optional Expulsion: Optional
    3rd Offense:
    Removal of all substances and paraphernalia Involvement of local authorities – Mandatory Loss of privileges / probation – mandatory Community Service: minimum 15 – 40 hours Counseling: Recommended
    Removal from Halls: Mandatory Expulsion: Optional
    ***Violations not highlighted in these sections will be disciplined at the discretion of the Residential Life Staff in accordance with the NCMC Handbook and policy and procedures manual.

    ADDENDUM C

    Alcohol and Other Drugs AOD 101

    Agenda

    • Introductions and confidentiality
    • What brought them here today – in their own words
    • Decisions they made regarding legal issues, college policies, etc.
    • Remind of confidentiality agreement
    • A completion of Alcohol 101 to the student and the staff member that referred them

    Alcohol Related

    • Sam Spady newspaper article about alcohol poisoning – read and write short essay (250 – 300 words)
    • Create a list of alternative activities (besides drinking alcohol)
    • Come in and use the Alcohol 101 CD and take the quiz (must do in ARC)
    • Must score 70% on quiz
    • Review correct answers to quizzes
    • Discuss any wrong answers and why
    • Discuss information they have learned and how will use it to inform decisions
    • Write a paper on alcohol: safe, responsible use – abstinence – support with sources
    • Collect papers and lists

    Drug Related

    Requirements to complete AOD 101:

    • Attend all sessions (must be there for the entire session)
    • Use the Alcohol 101 CD and take the quiz
    • Must pass the quiz (A score of 70% is required to pass the quiz)
    • Complete list of activities to do other than drinking
    • Write a two page paper

    Guidelines for paper:

    • Must be typed
    • Must be 600 words(include a cover sheet and sources list)
    • Use a cover sheet with your name and the date the paper is due
    • Margins can be no greater than 1”
    • Font can be no greater than 12pt
    • Cite at least 2 reliable sources on a separate sheet

    ADDENDUM D

    AOD 102

    Part 1

    • Introductions and confidentiality
    • What brought them here today – in their own words
    • Decisions they made regarding legal issues, college policies, etc.
    • Second offense? Discussion: why, what should next steps be? (Assessment by NCMC Staff – may require external counseling)
    • Discuss Case Studies
    • Assignments – Interview Project: Interview a person who works in the field you want to work in someday. Ask questions that will help detail qualifications needed, gather advice on how to put yourself in the best position to “win” a job in the field, discover the importance of background checks, gpa, related experience in the field etc… Ask questions and document.

    Part 2

    • Have rough drafts, expectations, learning outcomes.
    • (meet as needed, if needed to complete the assignments)

    Part 3 Post program:

    • Discuss information they have learned and how will use it to inform decisions
    • Collect and review paper
    • Final review and discussion
    • Remind of confidentiality agreement
    • Remind I will send a completion of AOD 102 to the student and the staff member who referred the student.

    Requirements to complete AOD 102:

    • Attend all scheduled sessions with NCMC Staff
    • Must conduct community/campus program with peers
        i.e. Mock tail party, conduct student survey, conduct virtual bar and goggle program with peers. Interview emergency personnel, police, doctors etc.
    • Report on data gathered from peer study, report on process, learning outcomes etc. (4pgs)

    Guidelines for paper:

    • Student must develop a program plan (draft)
    • Conduct a program
    • Report must be typed
    • Must be 4 pages (not including the cover sheet and sources list)
    • Use a cover sheet with your name and the date the paper is due
    • Margins can be no greater than 1”
    • Font can be no greater than 12pt
    • Cite at least 2 reliable/relevant sources to support data on a separate sheet R14

    ADDENDUM E

    Interview Project

    Interview Project:

    Research, Create a list of Questions, Interview and Document.

    Research Component
    The interview has a research component. For the Information Interview, at least three (3) outside sources must be employed and acknowledged. A source should be acknowledged at the point it is used in the interview. EXAMPLE:
    “According to a 1994 study performed by Elmer Fudd, professor of Rabbitology at Missouri Western State University, the rabbit was the ancestor of all present-day humans. Were your parents rabbits?”

    Remember that these sources should be used and acknowledged in the interview. Your research may consist of no more than one personal interview (NOT ordinary conversation). The following materials may be consulted, used, and cited:

    • personal experience
    • encyclopedias
    • dictionaries
    • books of quotations
    • lecture notes from a class you have taken in your field of study
    • advertisements
    • interviews with classmates or family members
    • textbooks or readings for your degree field
    • more than one personal interview

    Written Component

    You will prepare a detailed outline of your interview. This outline is not a script (since you should adapt your questions to the interviewee’s answers). It is a good idea to review prospective questions with a friend. Your outline must include the following components:

    • Exact date, time, and location of the interview
      Example
      Incorrect: Interview with my chiropractor last Thursday
      Correct: Interview with chiropractor Buster Spyne, Thursday, 18 January 2009, 10:00 a.m. at the Chiropractic center
    • Full text of all questions you plan to ask, phrased as you would ask them. Example
      Incorrect: Ask Lulu about her plastic surgery.
      Correct: Why did you decide to get cosmetic surgery at the young age of 13?
    • Complete questions organized into specific, labeled categories
      Example

      1. Introduction
        1. Rapport-building questions
          Question 1. [text of question]
          Question 2. [text of question]
        2. Explanation of interview procedure
      2. Body
        1. Personal background that prepared “X” for their current field
          Question 1. [text of question]
          Question 2. [text of question]
        2. What did it require to get qualified for the position?
          Question 1. [text of question]
          Question 2. [text of question]
          Question 3. [text of question]
        3. Policy positions and objectives
          1. Domestic policy
            Question 1. [text of question]
            Question 2. [text of question]
            Question 3. [text of question]
            Question 4. [text of question]
          2. Foreign policy
            Question 1. [text of question]
            Question 2. [text of question]
      3. Conclusion
        • Clearinghouse question [text of question]
        • Summary and thank-you
    • Cite resources, showing all research you conducted and used for this interview.
      Go to http://www.nwmissouri.edu/library/citing/apa.htm for proper citation guidelines.

    Remember, in the actual interview you probably will be adding, condensing, combining, or omitting some questions. That is perfectly normal and expected. You should, however, follow the overall pattern of questions in your outline and your specific agenda from your approved proposal.

    Your outline must be typed, double-spaced, in 12-font, Times New Roman, with adequate margins for comments, on standard letter-sized paper. Number all pages consecutively, and include your name and section in the header on the top-right. Staple all pages together in the upper left-hand corner.

    A Complete Interview Outline, including a list of questions, with your notes from the interview should be turned in with your completed paper.

    ADDENDUM F

    Alcohol Awareness Quiz

    1. Alcohol is a mood altering stimulant.   True  False
    2. Drinking coffee or taking a cold shower will sober you up.   True  False
    3. The affects that alcohol has on the body vary according to the individual.   True  False
    4. The most serious consequence of consuming alcohol is a hangover in the morning.   True  False
    5. Blood alcohol charts are a safe and accurate means of determining how much alcohol is circulating in your blood stream.   True  False
    6. If an intoxicated person is semiconscious, you should encourage vomiting.   True  False
    7. Women respond to alcohol differently than men do.   True  False
    8. Alcohol increases your sexual drive and ability.   True  False
    9. It is okay to put your drunk, passed out friend to bed and go back to the party.   True  False
    10. In Missouri, an underage drinker must be caught with alcohol in their possession to be charged with a crime.   True  False

    ADDENDUM G

    First Step Quiz

    (*Be specific and thorough in your answers. *Pay attention to your spelling and punctuation. *Watch your handwriting – make sure it is legible. *Do your own work!)

    1. What is alcohol poisoning? How can someone who drinks avoid this?
    2. What are the signs and symptoms of alcohol poisoning? (at least 4)
    3. What should you do if you think someone has alcohol poisoning?
    4. Explain how men’s and women’s bodies react to alcohol. Hint: Is it the same or different? Why?
    5. What impact do over the counter (OTC) pain relievers have on blood alcohol content (BAC)?
    6. How do cold/allergy medicines affect a person’s level of intoxication? Why are they dangerous to combine with alcohol?
    7. What are two myths associated with drinking alcohol?
      1.


      2.


    8. What causes a hangover?
    9. Passing out and blacking out are the same thing. True or False – Why?
    10. What affects how fast a person can “sober up”?
    11. Which organ is primarily responsible for metabolizing alcohol? How long does it take typically to metabolize one standard drink? What happens if you drink faster than that rate?
    12. How does the alcohol content of a standard of hard liquor, a 12 oz beer or malt beverage, or a glass of wine compare?
    13. Drinking alcohol can cause nausea. Why?
    14. Alcohol is a depressant. How does it affect your body?
    15. What does “HALT” mean in relation to drinking alcohol?
    16. List three (3) safety tips for smart, responsible partying.
      1.
       
      2.
       
      3.
    17. More than             % of 18-, 19-, and 20-year olds traffic deaths are alcohol-related. A young person dies in an alcohol-related traffic crash an average of once every           hours.
    18. True or False: The designated driver is the person who has had the least amount of drinks? Explain.
    19. Always eat before you drink.  True   False        Why? What?
    20. If you’re worried about the efforts of others to constantly top off your drink or pressure you to drink, what can you do?
      1. Alternate non-alcoholic drinks with Alcoholic drinks.
      2. Say No thanks I am on medication, or some kind of excuse to turn down the drink offered.
      3. Add ice cubes to your drink to make it look full.
      4. All of the above
    21. Complete this sentence: it is safe to consume a drink….
      1. that you have left it on a bar with a napkin over it.
      2. if its from a big punch bowl at the frat house.
      3. that is unopened and you open it yourself.
      4. If someone passes you a drink and asks you to take a sip.
    22. If you get pulled over and charged with DUI about how much will you have to pay?
    23. What possible effects will this have on you personally at college, home, and at your job?
    24. What should you do if you are at a party and have been drinking? Explain.

    ADDENDUM H

    Alcohol Myths

    Myth: “Everybody drinks.”
    Fact: at least 20% or 1 in 5 college students don’t drink.
    Myth: “I’m more fun drunk.”
    Fact: Very few people find a slurring, stumbling, puking, and loud person “fun”. But they may find you funny and be laughing at you instead of with you.
    Myth: “Everyone drinks a lot at parties.”
    Fact: If you stop and look around you will find that only a few people at a party are trashed, out of control, and/or a danger to themselves or someone else.
    Myth: “It is no one else’s business how much I drink. I’m not like a lot of people because I know how to handle it.”
    Fact: One person’s drinking habits can affect an average of five people other than the drinker. And if you try to drive you may have a permanent effect on someone else’s life or death.
    Myth: “There is nothing else to do but drink.”
    Fact: Wrong. Check you student handbook for ideas, read “This Week”, check out the bulletin boards, get involved, or volunteer. Or here is a really radical idea –spend two hours studying for each hour you spend in class and be the student who sets the curve in your classes.
    Myth: “I plan to have as much fun as I can while I am in college because I will have plenty of time to be serious after I graduate.”
    Fact: Your drinking habits may prevent you from being a successful student and graduating. Nationally 159,000 first-year freshmen will drop out of school this year for alcohol or drug- related problems. Now is the time to take your job of being a student seriously.
    Myth: “Drinking too much might make you sick but as long as you don’t drive a car it won’t kill you.”
    Fact: You don’t have to drive a car after drinking for it to be fatal. Alcohol poisoning and/or chocking on vomit are both very real risks for someone who drinks too much too fast, especially if the drinker passes out.

    ADDENDUM I

    What’s Your Booze Q

    ALCOHOL MYTHS & FACTS

    1. The U.S. has the strictest youth drinking laws of all Western countries and the highest minimum drinking age in the entire world.

      A: Fact. The U.S. government attempts to curb the use and abuse of alcohol by people under the age of 21 through legal restrictions.

    2. In the US, people of higher socioeconomic status are more likely to abstain from drinking alcohol.

      A: Myth. The truth is just the opposite: The lower the social class, the higher the abstention rate.

    3. Drinking alcohol raises body temperature.

      A: Myth. Actually, drinking lowers rather than raises the body temperature. Alcohol causes the capillaries to dilate and fill with more warm blood, creating the illusion of increased heat.

    4. Alcohol consumption goes up by as much as 40% during a full moon.

      A: Myth. Contrary to popular belief, alcohol consumption often decreases during the time of the full moon.

    5. People who drink responsibly and in moderation tend to be healthier and live longer than those who either abstain from or abuse alcohol.

      A: Fact. The highest death rate is among heavy drinkers. The lowest is for responsible, moderate drinkers. Abstainers fall in the middle.

    6. High tolerance (the ability to drink a lot and not feel drunk) is proof that a person does not have a drinking problem.

      A: Myth. People who can drink heavily without becoming intoxicated have probably developed a tolerance for alcohol, which can indicate the onset of dependency. High tolerance is one of the symptoms of a genetic predisposition to alcoholism.

    7. A mixed drink containing a carbonated beverage is absorbed into the body more quickly than a shot.

      A: Fact. The addition of a carbonated beverage accelerates the absorption of alcohol into the system.

    8. People in the US consume more alcohol than people in most other countries.

      A: Myth. Most people are surprised to learn that the US isn’t even among the top ten alcohol consuming countries. We’re number 32. The top ten: Portugal, Luxembourg, France, Hungary, Spain, Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Austria, and Switzerland.

    9. Your brain may take as long as 48 hours to return to normal after a big night of drinking.

      A: Fact. Heavy drinking, especially heavy binge drinking, can really wreak havoc on the noggin

    ADDENDUM J

    Who Am I Worksheet and Answers

    SUBSTANCE USE DISORDERS ANSWER KEY

    Who am I           HEROIN                  ? I am an opiate drug and produce a short-term feeling of euphoria, well-being and pain relief. However, when you take me there is a high risk of creating dependence. Some
    other associated problems include depression, alcohol dependence and criminal behavior. Those who use me are at a higher risk of suicide.

    Who am I         TOBACCO                ? Individuals who use me are more than twice as likely to have an anxiety disorder or depression, and are more than four times as likely to have symptoms of psychosis. I am also associated with schizophrenia. In fact, the Mayo Clinic estimates that 70 to 90 percent of people with schizophrenia are dependent on me.

    Who am I       METHAMPHETAMINES     ? I am a stimulant and I affect the central nervous system. Repeated use of me can lead to addiction, violent behavior, anxiety, confusion, insomnia, and psychotic behavior (including intense paranoia, and visual and auditory hallucination).I can be smoked, snorted, orally ingested, and injected. I come in many different forms and may be identified by color, which ranges from white to yellow to darker colors such as red and brown. I come in a powder that resembles granulated crystals and in a smokable rock form called “ice.”

    Who am I                    ECSTASY                  ? I have hallucinogenic properties and am often used as a “party drug.” Users can develop an adverse reaction that in extreme cases can lead to death. Users often report feeling emotionally close to others. Research on people who have used me regularly shows a reduced sexual interest and a range of mental health problems.

    Who am I                  MARIJUANA                  ? Based on data collected in 2001, more than 12 million Americans age 12 and older used me at least once in the month before surveyed. I am associated with mental health problems. In a long-term study of adolescents using me, it was found that the rate of anxiety disorder and depression in adulthood increased, especially for young women. The more frequent the use, the greater the risk of developing schizophrenia over the following 15 years.

    Who am I                  AMPHETAMINES            ? I am a stimulant and I come in many forms: powder, tablets, capsules, crystals, or liquid. I am known on the street as “crystal,” “speed,” “base,” “ice,” or “shabu.” I can cause “speed psychosis,” which involves symptoms similar to schizophrenia. The only proper use for me is for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), under the direction of a physician

    ADDENDUM K

    Student Athlete Drug Use Testing Policy

    4.4.00 Student-Athlete Drug Use Testing Policy (policy approved 8/28/12)

    4.4.10 Statement of Need and Purpose: Recognizing that observed and suspected use of alcohol and illegal drugs by North Central Missouri College student-athletes is increasing, a program of deterrence will be instituted as a pro-active approach to a truly drug-free college. Likewise, through participating in athletics, students using illegal drugs pose a threat to their own health and safety as well as to that of other students. The purpose is threefold:

    1. to provide for the health and safety of all student-athletes;
    2. to undermine the effects of peer pressure by providing a legitimate reason for student-athletes to refuse to use illegal drugs; and
    3. to encourage student-athletes who use drugs to participate in drug treatment programs. The program is designed to create a safe drug-free environment for student-athletes and to assist them in getting help when needed.

    4.4.20 Program Objectives: 1) to provide a deterrent to the use of illegal drugs by students participating in athletics at NCMC; 2) to give students a valid reason to resist peer pressure to use illegal drugs; 3) to prevent injury, illness, and harm as a result of drug use and its effects; and 4) to educate students as to the serious physical, mental and emotional harm cause by the use of illegal drugs.

    4.4.30 Drug Use Testing Policy to be Non-Punitive: No student-athlete will be penalized academically for testing positive for illegal drugs, banned substances, or other items listed in 4.4.70. The results of drug use tests pursuant to this policy will not be documented in any student-athlete’s academic records.

    4.4.40 Definition of an Athletic Program: An NCMC athletic program is an activity sponsored by the National Junior College Athletic Association and the NCMC Board of Trustees. The NJCAA states that athletic participation is a privilege and those student-athletes who use illegal performance-enhancing and/or recreational drugs substantively violate that privilege and may impact the athlete’s ability to take advantage of that privilege.

    4.4.50 Students to Declare their Intention to Participate in Athletics: All student-athletes participating in an in- season or off-season athletic program must declare their intention at the time of their enrollment for college each semester. At that time they will become subject to random drug testing for the entire semester or for as long as they participate in the program. Student-athletes who request to declare their intentions after enrollment must have an acceptable reason for not doing so at the appropriate time and must be approved by the coach(es) of the athletic program(s) in question as well as the Athletic Director. Student-athletes who declare late will then be subject to the random testing program for as long as they participate in the program. Any student-athlete not involved in an in/off-season program at the time of a particular random drug test period will not be subject to a random drug test.

    4.4.60 Consent Form to be Signed: All athletic program participants and their parents/guardians (depending on the legal age of the student-athlete) shall sign and date an Athletic Drug Use Testing Consent Form (see Appendix). This shall occur during the first semester of enrollment and shall stay in effect until the student- athlete leaves the athletic program. The student will be given a copy of the Student-Athlete Drug Use Testing Policy, along with the Consent Form, at the time of their registration in an athletic course. No student may participate in practice or competition (either in-season or off-season) until the form is properly executed and on file with the Athletic Director and appropriate coach.

    4.4.70 Selection for Drug Use Testing: At least five percent (5%) and no more than twenty-five percent (25%) of student-athletes in each in-season or off-season athletic program shall be randomly selected to be tested for drug use during each testing period, which shall be conducted no more than ten times per year. The percentage may be different for each test. The Athletic Director shall determine the percentage of student-athletes to be tested and the date for each test. He/she will draw student-athlete names at random. Student-athletes selected for testing during one test period will remain eligible for future tests and, if selected, may be tested in consecutive tests.

    4.4.80 Examples of Drugs for which to be Tested: Drugs that an individual may not buy, possess, use, sell, or distribute under federal or Missouri law including but are not limited to marijuana, cocaine, opiates, amphetamines, methaqualone, benzodiazepines, phencyclindine (PCP), methadone, barbiturates, and propoxyphene; all prescription drugs obtained without authorization; all prescription and/or over-the-counter drugs that are being used in an abusive manner; and performance-enhancing drugs. Tests for alcohol use may be by means of a breathalyzer or saliva test.

    4.4.90 Student-Athlete’s Right to Privacy: All aspects of the drug testing program will be conducted in a manner that will safeguard the personal and privacy rights of the student-athlete to the maximum degree possible.

    4.4.100 Sample Collection and Testing Procedures: Student-athletes who are selected to be tested for drug use will be required to report to Wright Memorial Hospital to provide a sample within sixty (60) minutes of the time that they are requested to do so. Refusal to provide a sample will be treated as a positive test for the student- athlete and the appropriate sanction shall be applied. NCMC shall give each student-athlete a form on which he/she may list any medications that he/she has taken or any other legitimate reasons for having been in contact with illegal drugs or performance-enhancing drugs in the preceding four (4) days.

    4.4.101 NCMC’s Athletic Director may accompany the student-athletes to Wright Memorial Hospital where the sample is to be produced under their supervision.

    4.4.102 Monitor(s) shall not observe the student-athlete while the sample is being produced but shall remain within hearing distance in order to guard against tampered samples and to ensure an accurate chain of custody of the sample. If at any time during the procedure a monitor has reason to believe that a student-athlete is tampering with a sample, the monitor may inform the Athletic Director who will determine if a new sample should be produced.

    4.4.103 All samples will be identified with the student-athlete’s assigned individual sport number and sealed.

    4.4.104 The designated Medical Review Officer (MRO) shall read the test and make a determination for further testing. Any licensed professional chosen by NCMC to conduct the subsequent testing shall be required to have detailed written procedures to assure proper chain of custody of samples, proper control, and scientifically validated testing methods. Student-athletes may be contacted directly by the MRO for clarification of test results.

    4.4.105 The licensed professional shall promptly contact the Athletic Director if the result of the drug use test is positive for any student-athlete.

    4.4.106 The Athletic Director shall promptly contact the student-athlete and his/her parents/guardians (depending on the legal age of the student-athlete) to schedule a conference.

    4.4.107 At the conference, the student-athlete or parents/guardians may offer any explanation of the positive result, including doctor’s prescriptions for any drugs the student-athlete has used which might affect the outcome of the drug use test or alcohol test. Another test may be requested on the remaining portion of the sample at the expense of the student-athlete.

    4.4.110 Sanctions for Positive Testing: A student-athlete who tests positive on a drug use test will be subject to the sanctions below. All offenses are cumulative for the student-athlete’s enrollment at NCMC.

    4.4.111 First Offense

    4.4.111.1 The student-athlete will be suspended from all athletic programs for a period of six (6) weeks commencing with the confirmation of a positive drug use/alcohol test.

    4.4.111.2 The student-athlete will submit to weekly drug use testing for six (6) weeks at their expense and participate in a drug assistance program that is designed to meet the needs of the student-athlete through mandatory counseling. A student-athlete may, at their expense, elect to pursue private counseling to fulfill this requirement; those unable to afford private counseling may be eligible to receive private counseling as arranged by the NCMC Dean of Student Services. As a condition of continued participation in NCMC athletic programs, student-athletes who elect private counseling are required to submit verification that they have received such.

    4.4.111.3 At the end of the six (6) weeks, if the student-athlete has completed a counseling program and tested negative on all drug use tests authorized by NCMC, he/she may resume participation in NCMC athletic programs.

    4.4.111.4 Failure to comply with the provisions above will result in the suspension of the student-athlete from athletic practice/competition for the remainder of the semester. If the suspension occurs during the last six (6) weeks of the semester, the suspension shall extend into the next semester.

    4.4.112 Second offense in any two (2) consecutive years:

    4.4.112.1 The student-athlete will be suspended from all athletic programs for the remainder of the current semester; however, if the suspension occurs during the last six (6) weeks of the semester, the suspension shall extend to the next semester.

    4.4.112.2 Under a full-semester suspension, the student-athlete will forfeit any athletic scholarship.

    4.4.112.3 The student-athlete must successfully complete, at his/her expense, an approved drug education/counseling program. Documentation shall include approved reports from the provider.

    4.4.112.4 The student-athlete will be subject to bi-monthly drug use testing, as authorized by NCMC, during the period of suspension at his/her expense. He/she must test negative on each test.

    4.4.112.5 Failure to comply with the provisions above will result in the suspension of the student-athlete from athletic practice/competition for an additional semester.

    4.4.120 Appeals: A student-athlete may appeal a suspension under this Policy to the Athletic Director by filing a written notice within five (5) days of the positive report of drug use. The student-athlete will remain suspended pending the appeal. The Athletic Director shall conduct an investigation to determine whether the original findings and suspension were justified. His/her findings may be appealed in accordance with existing Board policy.

    4.4.130 Volunteering for Help Component: Student-athletes with drug dependence may voluntarily be tested. They may obtain intervention and should be given help without automatic loss of eligibility. In order to participate in Volunteering for Help, a student-athlete must identify themselves and initiate a request to their coach or Athletic Director prior to being selected for random drug use testing. However, a student-athlete will not be permitted to enter the Volunteering for Help program less than thirty (30) days prior to an NJCAA or conference post-season competition.

    4.4.131 Program Purpose: Coaches occupy special roles in the lives of athletes, as student-athletes may choose to talk about a personal problem with a coach rather than a parent or other important adult. Therefore, this program allows a student-athlete to voluntarily come forward to ask for help.

    4.4.132 Program Promotion: Coaches shall inform their student-athletes at the beginning of the practice season of the Volunteering for Help program and shall provide this outline to their student-athletes.

    4.4.133 Drug Use Test Required: The student-athlete entering the Volunteering for Help program will be required to take a drug use test immediately to establish a baseline for follow-up testing. He/she will be referred to Wright Memorial Hospital for testing for the drugs listed in 4.4.70. Retesting will be limited to such drugs when the initial positive sample is among the drugs listed. The sample to be tested would be drawn at Wright Memorial Hospital and reviewed by the Athletic Director.

    4.4.134 Athletic Eligibility: A positive test from a volunteering student-athlete shall not be used to automatically remove athletic eligibility for six (6) weeks; instead, the test results will be used to help the provider complete an assessment on the extent of the problem. This assessment is necessary before an intervention program can be designed. The volunteering student-athlete will remain as a member of his/ her athletic team but will not practice/compete until a negative sample is verified by the College’s lab. This second test will be at the student-athlete’s expense. The student-athlete will regain athletic eligibility immediately upon lab verification of the negative sample.

    4.4.135 Program Steps: The NCMC coach or other staff member identified above shall meet with the student- athlete, and with his/her consent, the NCMC coach/staff member may arrange for a meeting with the parents/guardians (depending on the legal age of the student-athlete) and possibly other NCMC staff members. The Coach shall become involved in helping the student-athlete and family take the first step to getting trained professional help. Eventually, the student-athlete and/or family will select an agency from the approved provider list to get an assessment and begin an intervention program. If the student-athlete changes his/her mind, the Coach will ask for evidence (a negative sample) before any involvement in athletic programs is allowed.

    4.4.136 Status of Volunteer Student-Athlete: The status of a student-athlete who enters the Volunteering for Help program continues until the end of the season. If the season ends before six (6) weeks, the student-athlete’s status continues into the next season. Once the volunteer student-athlete regains athletic eligibility, at least two(2) tests have been conducted. One (1) additional test at the College’s expense will be conducted within four (4) weeks of the student-athlete’s return to athletic eligibility. After the volunteer student-athlete has had two (2) successive negative tests, the student-athlete shall be returned to the random drug use testing program.

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    91

    ADDENDUM L

    North Central Missouri College ATHLETIC DRUG TESTING CONSENT FORM

    Each student participating in the North Central Missouri College athletic program shall be provided with a copy of the “Athletic Drug Use Testing Policy” and the “Athletic Drug Testing Consent Form”, which shall be read, signed and dated by the student athlete, parent or custodial guardian and coach before the student shall be eligible to practice or participate in any athletic program. The consent shall provide a sample as chosen by the random selection basis and at any time requested to be tested for illegal drugs, prescription and over-the-counter drugs used in an abusive manner, performance enhancing drugs and alcohol. No student shall be allowed to practice or participate in any athletic program until the student has returned the properly signed Drug Testing Consent Form.
    Student’s Last Name, First Name and Middle Name


    Social Security Number (optional):


    I understand after having read the “Athletic Drug Use Testing Policy” and the “Athletic Drug Testing Consent Form” that out of concern for my safety and health, the North Central Missouri College enforced the rules applying to the use of illegal drugs, prescription and over-the-counter drugs used in an abusive manner, performance-enhancing drugs and alcohol. I realize that the personal decisions that I make daily in regard to the use of illegal drugs, prescription and over-the counter drugs used in an abusive manner, performance-enhancing drugs and alcohol may affect my health and well-being as well as the possible endangerment of those around me and reflect upon the North Central Missouri College athletic program with which I am associated. If I choose to violate college policy regarding the use of illegal drugs, prescription and over-the counter drugs used in an abusive manner, performance-enhancing drugs and alcohol, I understand that I will be subject to the restrictions of my participation as outlined in the policy. Furthermore, I understand that the financial assistance I am receiving to support my participation in athletics may be terminated as a result of the enforcement of this policy.
    Signature of Student


    Date


    We have read and understand the North Central Missouri College “Athletic Drug Use Testing Policy” and the “Athletic Drug Testing Consent Form”. We desire that                                                                                                                                                                         participate in athletics provided by North Central Missouri College, and we hereby agree for him/her to be subject to its terms. We accept the method of obtaining samples, testing and analysis of such specimens, and all other aspects of the program. We further agree and consent to the reporting of the results as provided in the program. Furthermore we understand that said student’s scholarship may be eliminated as a result of the enforcement of the policy.

    is taking or has taken the following medications in the last 96 hours (4 days):

    Signature of Parent:


    Date:


    Board Policy Manual updated.doc Last printed 10/15/2012 10:33:00 AM

    ADDENDUM M

    ATHLETIC DRUG TESTING HOSPITAL FORM

    North Central Missouri College
    Date:  


    Authorization for Wright Memorial Hospital to bill North Central Missouri College for the collection of a Urine Drug Screen on:
    Student Name:


    DOB: 


    SSN:


    (mark one)
      5 Panel Urine Drug Screen*   5 Panel Urine Drug Screen plus Ethanol
      10 Panel Urine Drug Screen   10 Panel Urine Drug Screen plus Ethanol


    Authorized Signature
    North Central Missouri College 1301 Main Street
    Trenton, MO 64683

    ADDENDUM N

    Part 86 Compliance Checklist
    Part 86, Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Regulations Compliance Checklist

    1. Does the institution maintain a copy of its drug prevention program?   Yes  No
      If yes, where is it located? Dean of Student Services office
    2. Does the institution provide annually to each employee and each student, who is taking one or more classes for any type of academic credit except for continuing education units, written materials that adequately describe and contain the following?
      1. Standards of conduct that prohibit unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol on its property or as a part of its activities
      2. Students:   Yes  No             Staff and Faculty:   Yes  No

      3. A description of the health risks associated with the use of illicit drugs and the abuse of alcohol Students:   Yes  No      Staff and Faculty:   Yes  No
      4. A description of applicable legal sanctions under local, state, or federal law Students:   Yes  No    Staff and Faculty:   Yes  No
      5. A description of applicable counseling, treatment, or rehabilitation or re-entry programs Students:   Yes  No       Staff and Faculty:   Yes  No
      6. A clear statement of the disciplinary sanctions the institution will impose on students and employees, and a description of those sanctions

        Students:   Yes  No          Staff and Faculty:   Yes  No

    3. Are the above materials distributed to students in one of the following ways?
      1. Mailed to each student (separately or included in another mailing)   Yes  No
      2. Through campus post offices boxes   Yes  No
      3. Class schedules which are mailed to each student   Yes  No
      4. During freshman orientation   Yes  No
      5. During new student orientation   Yes  No
      6. In another manner (describe) Email provided with link to all students once/semester. The report is also available at various locations on campus.
    4. Does the means of distribution provide reasonable assurance that each student receives the materials annually?   Yes  No
    5. Does the institution’s distribution plan make provisions for providing these materials to students who enroll at some date after the initial distribution?   Yes  No
    6. Are the above materials distributed to staff and faculty in one of the following ways?
      1. Mailed
        Staff:   Yes  No    Faculty:   Yes  No
      2. Through campus post office boxes
        Staff:   Yes  No    Faculty:   Yes  No
      3. During new employee orientation
        Staff:   Yes  No    Faculty:   Yes  No
      4. In another manner (describe): Email provided with link to all employees once/semester
    7. Does the means of distribution provide reasonable assurance that each staff and faculty member receives the materials annually?
      Staff:   Yes  No         Faculty:   Yes  No
    8. Does the institution’s distribution plan make provisions for providing these materials to staff and faculty who are hired after the initial distribution?
      Staff:   Yes  No         Faculty:   Yes  No
    9. In what ways does the institution conduct biennial reviews of its drug prevention program to determine effectiveness, implement necessary changes, and ensure that disciplinary sanctions are enforced?
      1. Conduct student alcohol and drug use survey   Yes  No
      2. Conduct opinion survey of its students, staff, and faculty
        Students:   Yes  No    Staff and Faculty:   Yes  No
      3. Evaluate comments obtained from a suggestion box
        Students:   Yes  No         Staff and Faculty:   Yes  No

        Students are provided an evaluation during OAR and an evaluation is provided at the end of the spring semester to all residence hall students.

      4. Conduct focus groups
        Students:   Yes  No     Staff and Faculty:   Yes  No
      5. Conduct intercept interviews
        Students:   Yes  No         Staff and Faculty:   Yes  No
      6. Assess effectiveness of documented mandatory drug treatment referrals for students and employees
        Students: Yes    No        Staff and Faculty:   Yes  No
      7. Assess effectiveness of documented cases of disciplinary sanctions imposed on students and employees
        Students:   Yes  No     Staff and Faculty:   Yes  No
      8. Other (please list):

        AOD Focus Group, involvement and input from the Wellness Committee, and the President’s Cabinet

    10. Who is responsible for conducting these biennial reviews?

      Dean of Student Services in conjunction with the Director of Housing and Human Resources Director

    11. If requested, has the institution made available, to the Secretary and the public, a copy of each requested item in the drug prevention program and the results of the biennial review?  Yes  No
    12. Where is the biennial review documentation located?

      Name: Dr. Kristen Alley
      Title: Dean of Student Services
      Department: Student Services
      Phone: (660)357-6400         
      E-mail: kalley@mail.ncmissouri.edu
      Comments: