NCMC Alumni Association


The Class of 2020

Most of the first time experiences in 2020 haven’t been positive but North Central Missouri College experienced a very positive first this year. The Class of 2020 marks the largest graduating class and hence the largest alumni class in the 93-year history of commencement ceremonies at the College.

The largest graduating class title was previously held by the Class of 2019 with 515 degrees and certificates awarded to 484 individual graduates. The Class of 2020 broke the record with 558 degrees and certificates awarded to 519 individuals. The record breaking number of degrees and certificates included: 174 associate in arts, 14 associate in arts in teaching, 217 associate in applied science, seven associate in general studies, and two associate in science. In addition, 144 certificates were awarded. The average age of the Class of 2020 is 24.9, with the oldest graduate being 58 and the youngest 18.  Graduates from the Class of 2020 hail from Alabama, California, Iowa, Illinois, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Nebraska, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and the countries of Aruba, Belize, Curacao, Germany, and the Philippines.

Together, the Class of 2020 and NCMC also experienced the first virtual commencement ceremony in the history of the College. Graduates, friends, and family members were able to watch a recorded virtual commencement ceremony including a welcome message to the newest members of the NCMC Alumni Association from distinguished alumnus, Chris Hoffman. The ceremony was broadcasted on YouTube and linked to a NCMC Commencement page.

NCMC honored graduates by encouraging congratulatory messages to be posted on the NCMC Facebook page. Each graduate was sent a packet in the mail that included their cap, tassel, a custom 2020 grad t-shirt, personalized notes from advisors, a 2020 commencement program, and if the graduate was a nursing student, a nursing pin. In addition, the College requested the campus community and extended family tie red and black ribbon around a tree, fence post, etc. to recognize graduates. Over the summer, graduates will receive their degrees in a keepsake degree cover, a message from our President, Dr. Lenny Klaver, and an alumni sticker to celebrate their transition from NCMC student to NCMC alum!  Pirate for Life!

More information about the NCMC Alumni Association can be found at https://www.ncmissouri.edu/alumni/ncmc-alumni/ and where alumni can also update contact information, nominate an alum for distinguished alumni and learn what is new and what is happening on campus.

“We encourage all TJC/NCMC alumni to stay connected to campus and visit often,” commented NCMC Director of Development Alicia Endicott.  “We hope students who have only completed courses and those who have graduated consider themselves to be a Pirate for Life.  We are proud of all the many accomplishments students have achieved over the 95-year history of the college and there are many more accomplishments to come.”

Katelyn Galloway – Class of 2018

Katelyn

Why did you choose NCMC?

In my junior year of high school, I created a goal for myself that I wanted to go through college debt free. After deciding on that goal, I realized that the only possible way I could achieve my goal was to start my education at a community college. North Central Missouri College was close to home for me, and I had already started to take dual credit classes through NCMC to work my way towards a degree. Before coming up with this goal, I had toured a few four-year universities, but they were just not where I wanted to start out. However, as soon as I stepped on NCMC’s campus, I knew that NCMC was the place for me. I felt like Goldilocks at NCMC because it was just the right size, just the right spot, and it was just like home to me. I recently went back to visit and the staff in the office still remembered my name, where I am from, and where I am going to college now. So it is safe to say NCMC is still home to me.

What do/did you like best about NCMC?

During high school, I was so involved that I almost reached the point of burn out. I decided that in college, I would focus on academics and not get involved. Even so, I still had to have a job to achieve my goal of obtaining a degree without debt, so I decided to get a job on campus. Someone I worked under at the Financial Aid Office was a co-advisor of a student organization for Phi Mu. I was super hesitant to attend their next meeting until she told me that there would be pizza. This was a life changing moment for me. Before I knew it, I was an officer of this organization, then I was a representative on Student Senate, then secretary of Student Senate, and somehow, I turned out to be president of Student Senate. If that NCMC employee did not push me out of my comfort zone to reach my full potential, I would not have had the same experience that I did at NCMC. It turned out that NCMC was not just a stepping stone for me to achieve my financial goal anymore. It was a place where I found another family–I had found a home away from home.

Do you have any advice for current or prospective students?

Going to a community college might not be what your friends are doing, but do not think for a second that it is not a good decision. If your goal is to earn a four-year degree, you will still be able to get a taste of a four-year university after attending NCMC. But make sure you take advantage of the unique atmosphere at North Central Missouri College first. NCMC can be a place where you find yourself and where you figure out what you want to do. And I am here to tell you, it is okay to not know what you want to do when you first step foot onto campus. The faculty and staff are there to help you along the way and get to know you as a person. They will push you to your full potential. No matter if you live at home, on campus, or in an apartment—GET INVOLVED. NCMC will be what you make it, so make it great and make it your home.
Where do you plan to attend school or work after NCMC?

What’s your current major and grade level?

This year I will be a senior at Northwest Missouri State University. In May 2020, I will graduate with a degree in agricultural education and agricultural business with a minor in agronomy. Because of all the opportunities at North Central Missouri College, opportunities such as scholarship donors, motivation to work, and true grit, I will complete my education without any debt and with a second place to call home in Trenton, Missouri.

Dr. Lester Skaggs Distinguished Alumni

Distinguished Alumni Class of 2007


A leader in the field of medical physics, a pioneer in the use of radiation to treat cancer, a member of the Manhattan Project, and a professor emeritus in the Department of Radiology and of Radiation and Cellular Oncology at the University of Chicago Medical Center are a few of the lifetime accomplishments of Dr. Lester Skaggs. This list of achievements may seem overwhelming and with good reason since few will reach the “highs” in their career that Dr. Skaggs enjoyed. However, this doesn’t mean each of us can’t reach our own personal level of greatness. I am certain, if we were able to go back and ask a young Lester Skaggs on the first day of his freshman year at Trenton Junior College (now North Central Missouri College) he could not have imagined where his education would take him and the success he would achieve. The NCMC Foundation each year selects a class of distinguished alumni and because of his achievements Dr. Skaggs was nominated and selected as a member of the NCMC Distinguished Alumni Class of 2007.

Born November 21, 1911, near Laredo, Missouri, Lester Skaggs grew up on a farm and attended a one-room school house. In high school, he and a friend built a radio, seeding his fascination with technical machinery. He was the oldest of three children and his father expected him to take over the farm, but Skaggs opted for a career in science. Skaggs graduated from TJC/NCMC in 1931 and transferred to the University of Missouri. In 1933, He earned a bachelor’s degree in chemistry with a minor in mathematics, followed by a master’s degree in physics in 1934. He entered the nuclear physics graduate program at the University of Chicago in 1935 and completed his Ph.D. in 1939.

Skaggs while working as a post-doctoral fellow in nuclear physics at the University of Chicago took a part-time job at Michael Reese Hospital with a radiation oncologist. After being drafted, he worked for the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism at the Carnegie Institute in Washington, DC from 1941 to 1943. During this time, he designed a system that used radio waves to detect proximity to an airplane and detonate anti-aircraft shells.

After being transferred to Los Alamos, New Mexico in 1943, the headquarters of the Manhattan Project, a secret military program to develop the atomic bomb, Skaggs was asked to adapt his anti-aircraft detection system into a proximity-based detonation device trigged by distance from the ground. This device allowed the plane dropping the atomic bomb additional time to fly out of the area.

After the war, he focused his attention on the medical applications of radiation. In 1945, he began working with Donald Kerst at the University of Illinois on a physics research project to extract an electron beam from betatron. During the project, a physics graduate student was diagnosed with an untreatable brain tumor and would become the first volunteer to receive radiation as a medical therapy. The technology did shrink the tumor but had no curative effects so unfortunately the student did die from his cancer.

Skaggs joined the faculty at the University of Chicago as an assistant professor of radiology in 1948. In 1949, he was promoted to associate professor and tasked with developing the radiation therapy facilities at the Argonne Cancer Research Hospital. ACRH was the first hospital devoted to the use of radiation in the treatment of cancer. During this time, Skaggs renewed his partnership with Lawrence Lanzl who he had worked with at the University of Illinois and together they designed a cobalt treatment unit. This eight-year endeavor lead to the development of the linear accelerator called Lineac which provided greater control of the penetration of radiation therapy. The Lineac remained in clinical use for 34 years.

Together in the mid-1950’s Skaggs and Lanzl launched the first master’s degree program in medical physics in the United States. In the 1960’s the program expanded to include a Ph. D degree in medical physics.

In 1956, Skaggs was promoted to the status of full professor and began designing /building one of the first analog computers used in the planning of radiation therapy. The computer calculated the dose of radiation to various tissues and was completed in 1963.

In the 1970’s, Skaggs and Franca Kuchnir developed a method to produce neutrons which lead to the first hospital-based fast-neutron therapy facility in the United States.

After 30 years of service, Skaggs retired from the University of Chicago in 1979. During the same year, he began a new job at the King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. He returned to the United States in 1984 after developing a neutron-therapy facility using a cyclotron.

Throughout his career, Skaggs was an author and co-author of nearly 50 research publications and was a Fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Royal College of Medicine and the American College of Radiology. He was active with the local Kiwanis in Park Forest, IL and built a public address system for his church. Skaggs loved astronomy and borrowed a telescope from the University of Chicago to gaze at the stars and the moons of Jupiter and Saturn.

Lester and Ruth Coffman Skaggs raised three children; John, Margaret and Mary. Together having traveled around the world three times they visited 51 countries and at the time of Ruth’s death in October 2005 they had been married for 66 years.

Lester Skaggs died on April 3, 2009 at the age of 97.

From humble beginnings, Dr. Lester Skaggs did achieve great things and serves as an example for everyone to not place limits on their education and on what they are able to achieve. Nominations for NCMC Distinguished Alumni are currently being accepted until January 6. To be a nominee a former student must be a graduate or have successfully completed at least one semester at TJC/NCMC, achieve success in their chosen professional field or through voluntary service, support the college, and be actively involved in their community including church, civic and family activities. An online nomination form is available at https://www.ncmissouri.edu/alumni/nomination-form/. The form may be completed and emailed to the NCMC Office of Development by clicking on the “Nominate” icon at the bottom of the form. If you are unable to email the completed online form and/or want to provide more information than space allows, you may print the form, attach a second page and mail the form to the NCMC Office of Development 1301 Main Street Trenton, MO 64683.

Tomi Hagan

Tomi

Why did you choose NCMC?

I initially chose NCMC because it was close to home and affordable, allowing me to pursue a career in healthcare while still taking care of my family. With a husband and three young children, I would not have had the opportunity to become a nurse if NCMC were not available.

What do/did you like best about NCMC?

I appreciated the excellent nursing instructors who truly cared about the success of their students. The passion the instructors demonstrated for nursing and educating helped make the experience memorable. My education at NCMC also prepared me well for the real world of nursing.

Do you have any advice for current or prospective students?

Don’t limit yourself. When I started nursing school, this was definitely not the career path I envisioned. Take chances and try new opportunities. And always continue to learn, whether through advanced degrees, career-specific certifications, or just networking within your industry.

What was your first job after graduating or attending NCMC (college)?

I worked as a Licensed Practical Nurse at Northwest Medical Center in Albany, MO while finishing my Associate Degree in Nursing. Upon graduation, I accepted a position as a Registered Nurse in the Obstetrics department at Wright Memorial Hospital in Trenton, MO.

What’s your current job and how long have you been there?

I recently became the Chief Compliance Officer for Great River Health System in West Burlington, Iowa.

What do you like best about your current job?

My job is interesting and challenging because we practice healthcare in such a complex regulatory and legal environment. I enjoy investigating and resolving complicated compliance issues, but my favorite part of my job is developing relationships with the Board, leaders, Medical Staff, and employees. Through these relationships, we are able to develop an effective compliance program and nurture a culture of compliance throughout the organization.

What are you most proud of (personal or professional) and why?

I am proud of the fact that I have been able to assist and support other compliance professionals through writing and speaking engagements and active participation in our professional organization.

Jessica Stonecypher

Jessica Stonecypher

Why did you choose NCMC?

NCMC was a no brainer choice when I began looking for colleges to attend. When looking at the perks that North Central offered, I knew that it was the right choice. I had the opportunity to continue my basketball career, take advantage of my A+, stay within the local northern Missouri area (but still get the dorm experience), and experience the smaller class sizes that the college had to offer. I knew, personally, that I wasn’t ready to move to a big city and become part of the crowd. NCMC provided an atmosphere where I would still be able to be involved and not just be a number on a roster.

What do/did you like best about NCMC?

When I think back on my time at NCMC, what comes to the forefront of my mind is community. It is a community that cheers you on. It is a community that has your back. It is a community that truly shows you support. Finally, it is a community that becomes like family. My educational experience was significantly impacted by the professors who truly invest in their students. They invest in you by challenging you to take that extra step, to push passed what you thought your boundaries were, and they truly want you to learn the material. Once I transferred on to a four-year university, it became apparent how much the instructors at NCMC strive to make a difference for their students.

Another thought that comes to mind while reflecting on my experience at NCMC is appreciating the values of the community. Whether at Ketcham Center, walking across campus, or in the admission offices, I would find those small town values that were so important to me. There is no doubt that going to college in a small town has its downfalls, BUT there is so much to learn from a place like NCMC. We always had that tight-knit community that looked out for each other, that were committed to each other and that showed integrity and dignity to each other. The character of NCMC has an excellent balance of these simple life values with progressive policies, practices, and technologies.

P.S. I feel like I am supposed to say something cheesy, like “what I liked best about NCMC was being proposed to in the middle of the basketball court!” While that was a very special memory, the college was simply the location. It was the people of NCMC that made that experience all the better.

Do you have any advice for current or prospective students?

My advice to current and prospective students is to get involved. Your experience at NCMC will be what you make of it. Go support the different sports teams, participate in the dorm activities, and hangout in the Ketcham Center. No matter where you live, it is always the people that build the memories and make the experiences. Be intentional about reaching out to others. If you are one that always puts in the effort, then keep putting that effort in (it will pay off). If you are the one who sits in the background, that is alright; just try your best to be comfortable with the uncomfortable situations. Know there will come a time when you will get overwhelmed with school, life, or a job. Cry it out! That is okay, but don’t dwell on those moments. Make the best out of the two years, you will miss it!

What was your first job after graduating or attending NCMC (college)?

After graduating NCMC, I transferred to Park University where I got my bachelor’s degree in accounting. During that time, I acquired a business apprenticeship at Cerner Corporation where I assisted program coordinators and managers in ensuring associates were able to log their weekly time and get paid for their travel. I also completed credit card authorizations and numerous other tasks as assigned. After graduating from Park University, I was hired as a full-time associate at Cerner Corporation as a Business Analyst. In my four-year, full-time tenure at Cerner, I got to experience numerous roles with many different responsibilities that included managing a team budget, running business reports, and implementing process improvements for the organization. I finished my time at Cerner with getting the opportunity to become a Data Analyst. In this role, I worked with clients to quantify the value in the implemented software that was being used. I would help them establish S.M.A.R.T. outcome targets that were achievable and would help track those targets with the client. Along the way, I would have the chance to help clients make process improvements to obtain better satisfaction of Cerner’s software.

What’s your current job and how long have you been there?

I am currently working for the US Army Corps of Engineers where I have been a Systems Accountant for the last year and a half. As a Systems Accountant, I am our database administrator for our agency’s financial system. The responsibilities of my position include reporting using SQL reports, functioning as the liaison between our district and headquarters’ program developers, and collaborating with the US Army Corps of Engineers Finance Center to ensure all payments, interest, accruals, bills, etc. are being process appropriately.

What do you like best about your current job?

My favorite part about my job is being able to make a difference by helping others. As the point of contact for our financial system, I get to speak to numerous people every day and assist them with their jobs. Being able to teach and help others make their jobs easier is why I do what I do. I also appreciate our responsibility at the Corps to reduce the risks from disasters and providing aid in those times of disaster.

What are you most proud of (personal or professional) and why?

I truly believe we could all name a personal or professional accomplishment such as “I married my best friend”, “I got employee of the month”, or “my team was conference champions”. I am not saying any of these are bad- actually all those are great and I encourage everyone to strive for the best. However, life is so much bigger than any award you could receive. With that being said, I have to claim my proudest attribute is that I have found contentment in a world that screams we must compare ourselves to others. Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, YouTube, etc. have all cultivated a culture where we can see peoples’ “best” lives.

In finding my contentment in a world that screams we must compare ourselves to others, I have to first explain what contentment is not. Contentment is not giving up on your dreams. Contentment is not letting life just pass you by. Contentment is not settling for whatever you get. Alternatively, contentment is being ok with the journey and path that you take. Starting your college experience at a community college is more than adequate. Many people take different paths to get to the same destination. Contentment is being able to turn the page when a mistake happens or there is a downfall in life. Those moments are not about how bad that fall was, but about being able to learn and stand back up stronger. This is not the last point I could make on contentment, but contentment is approving and owning your goals. Don’t let others persuade you that your goals aren’t attainable. Own those goals, push past the status quo, and never give up!

In finding contentment in a world of comparison, I have become more appreciative for those around me, for my own path I am taking in life, and cherish the littlest of accomplishments. I will never say it is wrong to be inspired by others, but take that inspiration and make it yours!

Terry Burrows

Terry Burrows

Why did you choose NCMC?

I chose NCMC because they provided the classes I needed to complete my degree and was close to home. During the time I was completing my degree, I had three small daughters at home.

What do/did you like best about NCMC?

I liked the smaller classrooms. They provided opportunity for one on one help and I liked the smaller campus and down to earth feeling.

Do you have any advice for current or prospective students?

It is never too late to start or finish your education. A degree can open up doors or allow you to reach better employment opportunities. Attending classes close to home can save you time and money.

What was your first job after graduating or attending NCMC (college)?

I was required to complete an internship and was fortunate to do mine at Trenton National Bank (now U S Bank). That internship lead to a full time position where I put my accounting skills to work.

What’s your current job and how long have you been there?

For the past 26 years, I have been the Billing Associate for Grundy Electric Cooperative.

What do you like best about your current job?

My job presents new challenges every day and I continue to learn new things. I get the opportunity to attend workshops that teach me new ways to do my job that will help me be more efficient.

What are you most proud of (personal or professional) and why?

I feel I have really grown into my job and have learned to deal with people and situations in a more positive way to help our member owners to know I sincerely care about problems or circumstances they face.


Connie Spellman

Connie Spellman

North Central Missouri College lost a member of the family on May 30, 2019. Connie Jo (Mortimer) Spellman died at the age of 78 at the home of her son, Phillip, in Olathe, Kansas. Connie was a key figure in the TJC/NCMC Library serving as an assistant librarian for 33 years. As alumni, if you were a student from 1978 to 2011 and walked through the doorway of the college Library then you met, and I bet remember, Mrs. Spellman. She had a welcoming smile, outgoing personality and a friendly demeanor that could not be missed or forgotten.

Connie Mortimer was born on August 21, 1940 in Chase, Kansas. She married Robert “Bob” Spellman on August 29, 1958 in Russell, Kansas. Together they had four sons, Garland, Phillip, Matt and Mark, which led to eight grandchildren and one great-grandchild. Bob preceded her in death in 1995 and Garland in 2005.

During her retirement in 2011, Connie was asked about working with NCMC students, faculty and staff. She replied by saying, “I love working with people.” We always have some students that will let you into their lives. Sometimes a helpful smile and a friendly word was all they needed, and I believe it’s no accident when we are able to positively influence the people we come in contact with. Also, I have been privileged to work with many, many good people at the college over the years. So many helped me – I remember the day that Ed Geyer came in to say I had to use a new electric typewriter, and then later, the day that Bill Ausmus said I had to start using a computer. Most of us learned the new equipment together by helping one another, and I am very grateful to my fellow employees for that. Those learning experiences were priceless. I hope I have helped, even in a small way, those who helped me; I can remember a few occasions when I know I was in the right place at the right time for someone who needed a friendly face.” (Trenton Republican-Times, August 31, 2011) Ann Sampson was the last librarian blessed with having Connie serve as her assistant. “Connie has a sincere smile for everyone,” Mrs. Sampson said. “Students love her for her patience and understanding – she has been an integral member of our library staff from yesterday’s filmstrips and card catalogs to today’s streaming videos and on-line databases. And she is a storehouse of institutional knowledge, a genteel lady of a time when loyalty to a place of employment was paramount and a gracious manner an unquestioned necessity.” (Trenton Republican-Times, August 31, 2011) When asked about her future plans Connie stated, “Well, I think I’ll take September off. I am going to continue to live in Trenton. Even though I wasn’t born here and my sons don’t live here, it’s my home. At the end of September, I think I will start to look around for a new way to help people. If the good Lord is willing, I will have about 20 years left for volunteer service. I believe that’s why I’ve been given these years on earth – to serve. And I hope to live to be 100! Wouldn’t that be wonderful?” (Trenton Republican-Times, August 31, 2011)

Not many people live to be 100 years old and it was not a milestone Connie Spellman was meant to reach, but there’s no doubt that she filled her 78 years and our 33 years with joy through her bright smile and devotion to her students, co-workers, family and her community.

Unknown Author. “Connie Spellman Retires After 33 Years.” Trenton Republican-Times. August 31, 2011.

Mark Holder

Mark Holder

Why did you choose NCMC?

I chose NCMC because it was very affordable. It was an excellent price per credit hour. The location was also great for me.

What do/did you like best about NCMC?

What I liked best about NCMC was getting all of my gen ed classes out of the way. It was also nice that my college credit from high school counted and transferred in.

Do you have any advice for current or prospective students?

NCMC is a great place if you don’t have a clear direction as to what you want your career path to be. Or if you do have a clear direction as to what you want your career path to be, it is still an excellent choice with a good selection of classes and well credentialed faculty.

What was your first job after graduating or attending NCMC (college)?

After NCMC I transferred to Northwest Missouri State. After Northwest Missouri State I was a manager within a grocery store chain (Hy-Vee).

What’s your current job and how long have you been there?

I am currently a Wealth Management Advisor with Northwestern Mutual. I have been doing this for 18 years.

What do you like best about your current job?

What I like best about being a Wealth Management Advisor is helping families and business owners protect and create wealth so that they can live the intentional life style they want at all times. It is my own business and I have a team of three. It is nice to have flexibility and create my own schedule.

What are you most proud of (personal or professional) and why?

I am most proud of building up by financial practice from scratch. It is now at a point where my long term succession will either be selling my business or transferring it down to my daughters if they are interested.


Linda Crooks

Linda Crooks

A Forty-four year teaching career started with $50.

Linda Crooks graduated from Trenton High School in 1967. She decided to attend Trenton Junior College now North Central Missouri College because she was awarded a $50 scholarship. In 1967, the cost for a student living within the R-9 School District to attend TJC was $60 per semester. Crooks graduated from TJC with an Associate of Arts Degree in the spring of 1969. She continued her education at Central Missouri State graduating in 1971 and earned her Master’s Degree in 1974.

Crooks forty-four teaching career included three states; Missouri, New Mexico, and Texas and multiple grade levels; elementary school, middle school, high school, community college and university classes. “Seems like a pretty good return on a $50 investment in my education”, stated Crooks when asked about the scholarship she received to attend TJC.

After her retirement, Crooks moved back to Trenton and in December of 2016 began building a fund for a NCMC Foundation Scholarship. The Linda Crooks Educational Scholarship became fully endowed in 2018. To qualify for the scholarship an applicant must resided in northern Missouri within NCMC’s 16 county region, have a 3.0 GPA as a freshman and a minimum 2.5 GPA as a sophomore. When asked why she wanted to start a scholarship Crooks stated, “I want to give back, I need to give back and I am now able to give back.”

Establishing a named scholarship in honor of a family member or in memory of a special friend is a wonderful way to leave a legacy. These endowed scholarships can be awarded in accordance with the donor’s specific wishes. Donors who have benefited from scholarships themselves can “pay it forward” or “give back” like Linda Crooks by establishing a named scholarship with their Gifts in Action.

Every donation to Gifts in Action will make a difference in the lives of NCMC students and help the leaders of tomorrow achieve their higher educational goals. The forty-four year teaching career of Linda Crooks is a perfect example of how each scholarship can make a major difference in the life of a student.


Jayne Meservey

Jayne Meservey

Why did you choose NCMC?

In the early 90’s NCMC had a wide variety of night classes. I was working full-time so night classes worked great for me. Of course at the time the location was very important. Now on-line offerings help us serve people all over the world.

What do/did you like best about NCMC?

NCMC provides a great blend of in class and electronic support. Recently, I took a class and found we had lecture time in class, and the lecture was available online to watch again. I have worked at NCMC over four years and am continuing to be impressed with my fellow workers in all areas.

Do you have any advice for current or prospective students?

For current students, use the resources available to you. If you have any questions about resources ask any NCMC employee.
For prospective students, don’t hesitate to try college even if your high school years were a struggle. College is different. I have done much better at college then I did in high school. NCMC courses are challenging, but with all the support available you can do well.

What was your first job after graduating or attending NCMC (college)?

After graduating NCMC I worked for a computer store in Chillicothe. My time at NCMC prepared me well for computer sales and that job led into computer repair for schools, businesses and individuals. The associate degree I earned at NCMC has been key to getting employment, although not all of them have been in the computer field.

What’s your current job and how long have you been there?

I have worked at NCMC for 4 1/2 years. I started in the Library as a Library Assistant. Last fall I moved to the Tutoring Center as the Tutoring Center Coordinator.

What do you like best about your current job?

I like people, so working with students is great! There is a wide variety of students, and each one adds to make my days of “work” enjoyable.

What are you most proud of (personal or professional) and why?

I am most proud of having students and staff who seek me out for support – they all know I love to talk.


Jennifer Lovell

Jennifer Lovell

Why did you choose NCMC?

I am originally from Trenton, so I chose NCMC because it allowed me to get a quality start on my education while staying close to home. I was able to take advantage of the A+ program to get my associates degree before then transferring to Truman State University.

What do/did you like best about NCMC?

I liked NCMC because it offered an affordable education with small class sizes. I enjoyed that there was a wide variety of classes available and that both night classes and online classes were options to create a schedule that worked best for me.

Do you have any advice for current or prospective students?

My advice for students would be to get involved and take advantage of the services and opportunities the college has to offer both inside and outside of the classroom. College is a great time to form life-long friendships and make networking connections for the future.

What was your first job after graduating or attending NCMC (college)?

After graduating from NCMC in 2002, I transferred to Truman State University in Kirksville, MO to receive my Bachelor of Science degree in accounting and then my Master of Accountancy degree. As a new CPA, my first job was a staff accountant position at Harden, Cummins, Moss and Miller, L.L.C. a public accounting firm in Chillicothe, MO.

What’s your current job and how long have you been there?

I am currently a CPA and partner at Harden, Cummins, Moss and Miller, L.L.C. in Chillicothe. I have been with HCMM for 13 years and became a partner in 2013.

What do you like best about your current job?

I love that my current job in public accounting allows me to work with a wide variety of individuals, businesses – both small and large, and charitable organizations. As a CPA working in a rural area, no two days are the same and I am constantly learning and growing in my profession. I also like that my current job allows me time to travel…outside of tax season, of course!

What are you most proud of (personal or professional) and why?

I am very proud of becoming a partner in a well-respected accounting firm at such a young age and that my job experience and financial background have then allowed me to give back to my local community. I volunteer on the boards for several local charitable organizations and I am thankful I have the opportunity to be involved and for the personal connections it has allowed me to make.


Stephanie Paasch

Stephanie Paasch

One of the greatest things about the formation of an alumni association is being able to touch base with alumni and hear where their journey from NCMC has taken them. While Stephanie Paasch still resides in Missouri (Troy, Missouri) her dreams and career have traveled from one side of the spectrum to the other.

Stephanie grew up in the St. Louis, Missouri area and decided to attend NCMC because of her family. She says “I chose NCMC to move closer to my grandparents. It was a great experience to be so close to them. For the first time in my life, I had so many options to see them more than a few times a year!” After earning an Associate of Arts in Business Administration from NCMC in 1999, Stephanie transferred to Missouri Western State College (now Missouri Western State University) in St. Joseph, MO. While attending MWSU she earned a Bachelor of Science in Administration with a double major in Management and Marketing.

Stephanie, with her multiple business degrees in hand, worked for the next 18 years in management positions, banking – loans, and business development roles. Last year Stephanie decided it was time to leave the stress of hitting goals set for her by corporate and follow her dream of becoming an author. She currently is an author of children’s books and the owner of a small publishing house which helps “new authors take their idea and turn it into wonderful children’s stories.” Her debut series is called “The Adventures of Sparklepants.” Since making the decision to leave the corporate/business world behind, Stephanie says, “Now I have the freedom to conquer my own success and I set my own goals. I love the flexibility and creativity of my author career.
Stephanie is married to her childhood sweetheart, Chad, and is a mother to Serrina, 16; Colby, 13; and Caitlyn, 10.


Amy Chandler

Amy Chandler  Activity

North Missouri and the Midwest is full of NCMC Alumni doing great things to benefit their communities and alumni Amy Chandler is no exception. Amy attended NCMC from 1993-1995 and was a Lady Pirate Softball player. Amy appreciates her time playing softball for the Pirates, “You are playing with the best of the best and most of my fondest memories from attending NCMC was playing softball or just hanging with the softball team.

After earning her associates in applied science from NCMC Amy went on to finish her bachelor’s degree at Northwest Missouri State University in Advertising with a minor in Psychology. Amy has always had a good work ethic. During her time at NCMC, Amy maintained an 18 hour course load with her softball schedule and had a part-time job. Now as an American Family Insurance Agent in Bethany she can still wear many hats, including being the President of the Cainsville Community Betterment.

Cainsville, Missouri has a population of 278 and it became a Missouri Community Betterment Community over 15 years ago. The past 4 years Amy has been president and under her leadership progress continues.

Amy’s great-grandparents, grandparents and parents were from Cainsville and as people come and go, things change and some things get neglected and forgotten. Now a community of dozens of volunteers is helping to make sure Cainsville is not forgotten.

Amy outlines some of the recent projects of the Cainsville Community Betterment, “We have paid to have concrete dug up and new laid in front of some of the old buildings on the square. We helped convert the old Catholic church into a community building with the city council. We bought new playground equipment for the community building and the ball park and installed it at both locations. We still maintain the playground equipment for both locations, replacing items like swings if they get broken. We are currently restoring an old gas station on the square into a Cainsville History Museum. We are painting the buildings on the square to give them a face lift, as well as the playground equipment on the square. We are also working on a military wall that will be displayed on the front of our city hall building.

When we asked Amy what has been the most rewarding part of the Cainsville Community Betterment she replied, “Giving back to my community. I love seeing other people in town joining together to make our little town a better place to live.

NCMC Alumni we want to share what you are doing to make your community a better place. Please contact us at www.ncmissouri.edu/alumni or email [email protected].


NCMC Foundation

The NCMC Foundation was formed with alumni relations in mind. Please let Foundation members or NCMC Development staff know how we can better serve and reach our alumni family and friends.