North Central Missouri College
NC Interlock logo

1-660-359-3948
© Copyright – All rights reserved
Span of campus

Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Program

Foundational Belief of NCMC AOD Programming

North Central Missouri College is a two-year community college that prides itself on being a small, tight-knit community of learners. Care and compassion for one another permeates the culture of the institution and work together to assist students and staff in reaching their goals and being productive members of society. The misuse and abuse of alcohol and other drugs have the potential to threaten the culture and goals. As a result, NCMC is committed to promoting individual well-being and promotion of healthy, productive choices.

Alcohol and Other Drug Program Goals

  • Promote low-risk/no-risk choices regarding alcohol and other drugs
  •  Decrease number of documented alcohol incidents in residence halls
  • Encourage students to avoid drinking and driving
  • Promote the well-being of NCMC students and staff

Institutional Mission

North Central Missouri College provides accessible, affordable, and quality educational programs, with emphasis on excellence in teaching, learning, student services, diversity and inclusiveness, and workforce development to all communities and rural areas of our 17-county service region.

Policies

ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG POLICY

In accordance with federal law, and as described in more detail below, NCMC has adopted and implemented a program and policies to prevent the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by students and employees. NCMC will impose disciplinary sanctions for violations of this policy and any additional policies noted in official college publications.

Students

Students are expected to comply with local and state laws pertaining to alcoholic beverages, controlled substances, and illegal drugs. In addition, the manufacture, distribution, sale, possession, consumption, use or transportation of alcoholic beverages, controlled substances, and illegal drugs and/or possession of drug paraphernalia by any student on North Central Missouri College property, at any college-sponsored student activity, or at NCMC approved classes, field trips or activities off campus shall be strictly prohibited. This includes possession of alcoholic beverage containers.

No student shall be in an intoxicated condition, which may be evidenced by disorderly, obscene, or indecent conduct or appearance, while on campus or at a college approved event off campus. No student shall furnish or cause to be furnished any alcoholic beverage to any person under the legal drinking age. Missouri under-age drinking laws and federal and state drug laws regarding the possession, use and sale of illegal drugs will be enforced through judicial referrals and/or reporting incidents to the police department.

NCMC will impose sanctions, consistent with local, State, and Federal law, for violations of NCMC alcohol and drug policies and the Student Code of Conduct. Sanctions may include work assignments, behavioral contracts, verbal warning, written warning, loss of privileges, probation, suspension, expulsion from the halls and/or campus, or imposition of a lesser sanction. Sanctions may also include classes, community service, referrals for appropriate counseling and/or referral to local law enforcement for prosecution. If the student is an employee, the student may face termination from their position. If a student is convicted of violating criminal laws regarding alcohol or drugs, they may be subject to civil action. Legal sanctions may include classes, community service, fines, prison terms, loss of driving privileges, and mandated rehabilitation programs. In addition, a student convicted for the possession or sale of illegal drugs may have financial aid eligibility suspended if the offense occurred while the student was receiving federal student aid.

Employees

The unlawful possession, purchase, manufacture, use, sale or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by employees on college property or at any of its activities is prohibited. Violations of NCMC alcohol and drug policies, as stated in college policies or employee handbooks/manuals, may result in disciplinary action including corrective discipline, counseling, (faculty) reassignment, verbal warnings, documented warnings, probation, suspension with or without pay, and discharge for employees and/or referral to local law enforcement for prosecution.

If an employee is convicted of violating criminal laws concerning alcohol or drugs, in addition to civil action, the employee may be subject to termination. Legal sanctions may include classes, community service, fines, prison terms, loss of driving privileges, and mandated rehabilitation programs. Failure to disclose previous convictions on a job application is grounds for termination.

If an employee is convicted for a violation of a criminal drug statute occurring in the workplace, the employee shall notify the HR office no more than five calendar days after such conviction. After receiving such notice, NCMC will notify the Department of Education in writing within 10 calendar days after receiving notice from an employee of such conviction. The notice will include the employee’s position title. Within 30 days of receiving such notification, NCMC will take appropriate personnel action against such employee up to and including termination or require the employee to participate satisfactorily in a drug abuse assistance or rehabilitation program approved for such purposes by a federal, state, or local health, law enforcement or other appropriate agency.

OTHER POLICY AND REGULATIONS

In addition to the student and employee Alcohol and Other Drug Policy, there are other policies that comprise the College’s drug and alcohol program and services.

College Catalog

  • Non-Academic Misconduct
    Possession, consumption, public intoxication or distribution of alcoholic beverages is strictly prohibited on all College property or at any college sponsored student activity. This includes possession of alcoholic beverage containers. 12. Possession, use, manufacture, sale or distribution of illegal drugs and/or possession of drug paraphernalia.
  • Tobacco Policy
    Tobacco usage is prohibited on campus including the residence halls and parking lots. Prohibited use includes all tobacco products, including: cigarettes, electronic cigarettes/vapes, cigars, hookah- smoked products, spit and smokeless tobacco, chew, snuff, snus, clove cigarettes, bidis, kreteks and cigarillos.

Residence Life Policies and Procedures  

https://www.ncmissouri.edu/studentlife/wp-content/uploads/sites/22/2016/11/FinePrint.pdf

The rules and procedures of the housing program are aimed toward assisting students in achieving the highest possible academic goals and socially responsible behavior. It is the philosophy of the Office of Residence Life that violations should be handled in such a way as to inform and guide students toward the development of personal responsibility. Student behavior is expected to be lawful and in abidance with all federal, state and college regulations. Through the terms and conditions of the contract, housing publications and explanations at residence hall meetings, students should have a clear understanding of their responsibility regarding housing rules and expectations. Such rules apply to all residence hall students and their guests.

The following are excerpts from the Student Conduct Policy/Procedures contained in the above document:

IV. Discipline Policy/Guidelines
The Resident Coordinator, through the Resident Assistants, has the authority and responsibility to uphold ethical and responsible behavior in the residence halls. Contact of parents is at the discretion of Student Affairs and Residential Life staff.

  1. Misconduct subject to disciplinary penalties
    The following actions constitute misconduct for which students may be subject to
    administrative action or disciplinary penalties:

    • 6. Having alcohol related paraphernalia or alcohol container collections. Alcohol posters or displays in a residence hall room window.
    • 8. Consuming alcoholic beverages on college property
    • 9.Being under the influence of alcohol while on college property or in connection with a college activity.
    • 14. Having alcohol in your room, in a residence hall, on any college property or at a college activity. STUDENTS SHOULD REMEMBER THAT NCMC IS AN ALCOHOL-FREE CAMPUS.
    • 21. Possession of drug and/or narcotic paraphernalia or drug and/or narcotic related paraphernalia displays except as expressly permitted by law.
    • 22. Use, possession, or distribution of narcotics and/or dangerous drugs except as expressly permitted by law.

Student-Athlete Drug Use Testing Policy

In 2012, discussions with the President, Athletic Director, and coaches ensued regarding drug-use testing. A review of other institution’s drug use policies was conducted and policy was developed. The policy was presented to the President’s Cabinet for review and suggestions. The final policy was approved by the NCMC Board of Trustees on 8/28/12 and the first random drug test took place in Fall 2012. The College continues to issue random drug testing every semester.

Information Regarding Potential Legal Sanctions

NCMC supports the laws and regulations of the United States of America, the State of Missouri, Grundy County, and the City of Trenton as well as the counties and cities in which NCMC outreach sites are located. Each student and employee is expected to do the same. Applicable legal sanctions under state, local, and federal law can include: forfeiture of personal property and real estate, fines, revocation of driver’s license, probation, parole, imprisonment, mandatory minimum sentences, and deportation for non-US citizens. Conviction of a federal drug crime can also result in the loss of eligibility for Federal financial aid.

A Federal Trafficking Penalties table, obtained from the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (https://www.dea.gov/sites/default/files/2018-06/drug_of_abuse.pdf#page=30), is provided below:

Federal Trafficking Penalties

Drug/ScheduleQuantityPenaltiesQuantityPenalties
Cocaine (Schedule II)500-4999 grams mixtureFirst Offense: Not less than 5 yrs, and not more than 40 yrs. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 or more than life. Fine of not more than $5 million if an individual, $25 million if not an individual.5 kilograms or more mixtureFirst Offense: Not less than 10 yrs, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 or more than life. Fine of not more than $10 million if an individual, $50 million if not an individual.
Cocaine Base (Schedule II)28-279 grams mixtureSecond Offense: Not less than 10 yrs, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, life imprisonment. Fine of not more than $8 million if an individual, $50 million if not an individual.280 grams or more mixtureSecond Offense: Not less than 20 yrs, and not more than life. If death or serious injury, life imprisonment. Fine of not more than $20 million if an individual, $75 million if not an individual.
Fentanyl (Schedule II)40-399 grams mixture400 grams or more mixture2 or More Prior Offenses: Life imprisonment. Fine of not more than $20 million if an individual, $75 million if not an individual.
Fentanyl Analogue (Schedule I)10-99 grams mixture100 grams or more mixture
Heroin (Schedule I)100-999 grams mixture1 kilogram or more mixture
LSD (Schedule I)1-9 grams mixture10 grams or more mixture
Methamphetamine (Schedule II)5-49 grams pure or
50-499 grams mixture
50 grams or more pure
or 500 grams or more mixture
PCP (Schedule II)10-99 grams pure or
100-999 grams mixture
100 grams or more pure
or 1 kilogram or more mixture

Penalties

DRUG/SCHEDULEQUANTITYPENALTIES
Other Schedule I & II drugs (and any drug product containing Gamma Hydroxybutyric Acid) Flunitrazepam (Schedule IV)Any amount
1 gram
First Offense: Not more than 20 yrs. If death or serious injury, not less than 20 yrs, or more than life. Fine $1 million if an individual, $5 million if not an individual.
Second Offense: Not more than 30 yrs. If death or serious bodily injury, life imprisonment. Fine $2 million if an individual, $10 million if not an individual.
Other Schedule III drugsAny amount
First Offense: Not more than 10 years. If death or serious injury, not more that 15 yrs. Fine not more than $500,000 if an individual, $2.5 million if not an individual.
Second Offense: Not more than 20 yrs. If death or serious injury, not more than 30 yrs. Fine not more than $1 million if an individual, $5 million if not an individual.
All other Schedule IV drugsAny amountFirst Offense: Not more than 5 yrs. Fine not more than $250,000 if an individual, $1 million if not an individual.
Second Offense: Not more than 10 yrs. Fine not more than $500,000 if an individual, $2 million if other than an individual.
Flunitrazepam (Schedule IV)Other than 1 gram or more
All Schedule V drugsAny amountFirst Offense: Not more than 1 yr. Fine not more than $100,000 if an individual, $250,000 if not an individual.
Second Offense: Not more than 4 yrs. Fine not more than $200,000 if an individual, $500,000 if not an individual.

3-Federal Trafficking Penalties Table 3

DRUGQUANTITY1st OFFENSE2nd OFFENSE
Marijuana (Schedule I)1,000 kg or more marijuana mixture; or 1,000 or more marijuana plantsNot less than 10 yrs. or more than life. If death or serious bodily injury, not less than 20 yrs., or more than life. Fine not more than $10 million if an individual, $50 million if other than an individual.Not less than 20 yrs. or more than life. If death or serious bodily injury, life imprisonment. Fine not more than $20 million if an individual, $75 million if other than an individual.
Marijuana (Schedule I)100 kg to 999 kg marijuana mixture; or 100 to 999 marijuana plantsNot less than 5 yrs. or more than 40 yrs. If death or serious bodily injury, not less than 20 yrs. or more than life. Fine not more than $5 million if an individual, $25 million if other than an individual.Not less than 10 yrs. or more than life. If death or serious bodily injury, life imprisonment. Fine not more than $20 million if an individual, $75million if other than an individual.
Marijuana (Schedule I)More than 10 kgs hashish; 50 to 99 kg marijuana mixture More than 1 kg of hashish oil; 50 to 99 marijuana plantsNot more than 20 yrs. If death or serious bodily injury, not less than 20 yrs. or more than life. Fine $1 million if an individual, $5 million if other than an individual.Not more than 30 yrs. If death or serious bodily injury, life imprisonment. Fine $2 million if an individual, $10 million if other than an individual.
Marijuana (Schedule I)Less than 50 kilograms marijuana (but does not include 50 or more marijuana plants regardless of weight) 1 to 49 marijuana plants;Not more than 5 yrs. Fine not more than $250,000, $1 million if other than an individual.Not more than 10 yrs. Fine $500,000 if an individual, $2 million if other than individual.
Hashish (Schedule I)10 kg or less
Hashish Oil (Schedule I)1 kg or less

*The minimum sentence for a violation after two or more prior convictions for a felony drug offense have become final is a mandatory term of life imprisonment without release and a fine up to $20 million if an individual and $75 million if other than an individual.

Missouri Penalties

In addition to the information listed above, a complete listing of Missouri substances, how they are placed on the schedule and additional drug information, can be found at: https://health.mo.gov/safety/bndd/laws.php

Health Risks

Substance abuse may result in a wide array of serious health and behavioral problems. Substance abuse has both long and short-term effects on the body and the mind. Alcohol and drugs are toxic to the human body. In addition to the problem of toxicity, contaminant poisonings often occur with illegal drug use. HIV infection with intravenous drug use is a prevalent hazard.

Acute health problems may include heart attack, stroke, and sudden death, which can occur for first time cocaine users. Long lasting effects caused by drug and alcohol abuse can cause problems such as disruption of normal heart rhythm, high blood pressure, leaks of blood vessels in the brain, bleeding and destruction of brain cells, possible memory loss, infertility, impotency, immune system impairment, kidney failure, cirrhosis of the liver, and pulmonary damage. Drug use during pregnancy may result in fetal damage and birth defects causing hyperactivity, neurological abnormalities, and developmental difficulties.

ADDITIONAL HEALTH RISKS

SubstanceSome Possible Long-Term Effects
Alcoholtoxic psychosis, physical dependence, neurological and liver damage, fetal alcohol syndrome, impaired judgment
Amphetamines
uppers, speed, crank
loss of appetite, delusions, hallucinations, heart problems, hypertension, irritability, insomnia, toxic psychosis, rebound depression
Barbiturates
barbs, bluebirds, blues
severe withdrawal symptoms, possible convulsions, toxic psychosis, depression, physical dependence, impaired judgment
Benzodiazepines (Valium, Xanax, Ativan, Dalmane, Rohypnol)
benzos, downers, sleepers, tranqs, roofies
impaired judgment, sedation, panic reaction, seizures, psychological dependence, physical dependence
Cocaine & Cocaine freebase
coke
loss of appetite, depression, weight loss, seizure, heart attack, stroke, hypertension, psychosis, chronic cough, nasal passage injury, hallucinations
Codeinephysical dependence, constipation, loss of appetite, lethargy, respiratory depression
Heroin
H, junk, smack
physical dependence, constipation, loss of appetite, lethargy, respiratory depression
Inhalants
ames, gas, laughing gas, poppers, snappers
psychological dependence, psychotic reactions, confusion, frozen airway, sudden death
LSD
acid
may intensify existing psychosis, panic reactions, can interfere with psychological adjustment and social functioning, insomnia, flashbacks
MDA, MDMA, MOMA
ecstasy, xtc
same as LSD, sleeplessness, nausea, confusion, increased blood pressure,sweating, paranoia
Marijuana (cannabis)
pot, grass, dope, weed, joints
bronchitis, conjunctivitis, mood swings, paranoia, lethargy, impaired concentration
Mescaline (peyote cactus)
mesc, peyote
may intensify existing psychosis, hallucinations at high dose
Methaqualone
ludes
coma, convulsions
Morphine
M, morf
physical dependence, constipation, loss of appetite, lethargy
PCP
crystal, tea, angel dust
psychotic behavior, violent acts, psychosis, hallucinations at high dose
Psilocybin
magic mushrooms, shrooms
may intensify existing psychosis
Steroids
roids, juice
cholesterol imbalance, acne, baldness, anger management problems, masculinization of women, breast enlargement in men, premature fusion of long bones preventing attainment of normal height, atrophy of reproductive organs, impotence, reduced fertility, stroke, hypertension, congestive heart failure, liver damage, depression

Provided courtesy of the University of Washington.

Alcohol and Drug Abuse Information and Programs

The College assists in drug education and prevention programs to reduce the abuse and illegal use of alcohol and other drugs. There are a variety of proactive and reactive resources available to our campus community members.

During Orientation, Advising, and Registration (OAR), first-time NCMC students are introduced to our alcohol policy, resources available to them, and healthy choice options.  During College Seminar, a class typically taken by first year students, the topic of substance abuse is also addressed, including risk reduction information.

For students who violate college policy, concerted effort is made to inform and educate. A protocol is implemented to ensure consistency in sanctioning and to prevent the behavior from re-occurring.  First-time violators of the College’s substance abuse policies are required to attend a substance abuse education class, Alcohol 101, as part of the disciplinary process. Students take an assessment and the focus is on education, reflection, and alternative, healthy choices.  If the violation occurs again, students will take Alcohol 102.  During this class, students will be required to complete a special project that addresses the behavior, as well as how those decisions fit into future life goals.  Specific information for these classes can be found in the Alcohol and Drug Biennial Review.

The College also provides education through various initiatives such as Safety Week, National Collegiate Alcohol Awareness Week, and other programmatic efforts.  Dissemination of informational materials, educational programs, and counseling referrals are also made on an individual basis.

TREATMENT PROGRAMS

NCMC understands that alcoholism and drug abuse are treatable illnesses and encourages any member of the campus community who may have alcohol or drug abuse problems to seek treatment. Any employee afflicted by alcoholism or drug dependency will have the same options as those with other illnesses to participate in prescribed treatment programs. Employees and students with health insurance should consult their health insurance plan to determine the treatment program coverage that may be available to them.

In 2022, North Central Missouri College hired a full-time, on-campus counselor. Any NCMC student can meet with the counselor, free-of-charge. The counselor can provide therapy, as well as referral assistance to those students who need additional help and/or intervention with an alcohol or substance abuse problem. In addition, NCMC works with Central Methodist University to provide virtual counseling to students and employees. Locally, counseling and referral assistance to students and employees is provided by North Central Missouri Mental Health Center (NCMMHC) and Preferred Family Healthcare. The Vice President of Student Affairs can assist students in setting-up counseling services through an agreement between NCMC and NCMMHC. NCMC employees may also seek assistance through the NCMC EAP program through United Healthcare. Specific information is available for employees by contacting the Business Office or visiting the United Healthcare website. Any member of the College community that is experiencing symptoms associated with their own or someone else’s alcohol or drug use is encouraged to seek help.

NCMC provides a list of resources available to anyone who is struggling with substance abuse.  The information can be found on the website, under Substance Abuse, Self Help, or Counseling Services.

Alcohol and Other Drugs Biennial Review

In compliance with federal requirements under the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act, NCMC compiles a Biennial Review of the College alcohol and drug policy and initiatives. The Biennial Review includes: foundational belief, a review of policy, annual notification, goals, statistical reporting elements, enforcement/sanction consistency, AOD campus efforts, measured effectiveness of the policy and programs through a SWOT analysis, and identified improvements that can be made. The Alcohol and Drug Biennial Review is available at:
https://ncmissouri/consumerinfo/wp-content/uploads/sites/26/2016/11/biennial_review.pdf.ncmissouri.edu/about/Documents/biennial_review.pdf on the Student Consumer Information page at: https://www.ncmissouri.edu/consumerinfo , and in the following locations: Vice President of Student Affairs’ Office, Vice President of Academic Affairs’ Office, and the Human Resources Office.

Annual Notification and Distribution

AOD policy notification to all NCMC students and employees is made in the following ways:

  • Email
  • Provided on the Student Consumer Information page
  • Provided during Orientation, Advising, and Registration (OAR)
  • Provided as part of the Clery Report
  • Reviewed during new employee orientation

Paper copies are available upon request at the following offices: Vice President of Student Affairs, Vice President of Academic Affairs, Dean of Instruction, or Human Resources