Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)

The Difference Between Seasonal Flu and Pandemic Flu

NCMC COMMUNITY COVID-19 DASHBOARD

Week 9/02/20  
Week 9/11/20  
Week 9/16/20 
Week 9/23/20 
Week 9/30/20 
Week 10/7/20 
Week 10/14/2020 

NCMC REPORTING FORM

NCMC COVID-19 Reporting Form

NCMC PROTOCOL

Positive Protocol (PDF) 
Close Contact Protocol (PDF) 
Symptoms Protocol (PDF) 

QUARANTINE/ISOLATION

Resources (PDF) 

CARES ACT/HEERF FUNDING INFORMATION

NCMC CARES Grant Application and Information

EVENT CANCELLATIONS/POSTPONEMENTS

List of NCMC event details, cancellations and postponements

PRESS RELEASES

Fall 2020

Student Fall 2020 Start-Up Information (PDF) 

Spring 2020

Ketcham Community Center Phase 1 Guidelines: May 11-June 1 -5/6/2020
Remote Operations Continues Until May 11, 2020 -4/8/2020
Important Payment Deadlines for Spring 2020 -3/24/2020
2020 Commencement Event Cancelled -3/23/2020
Federal Student Aid Information -3/19/2020
Student Notice – Online Classes Remain for Spring Semester -3/17/2020
Residence Hall Move-Out Instruction -3/17/2020
Memo to NCMC Student Athletes -3/13/2020
NCMC On-Ground Classes Move to Online, March 23-April 3. -3/12/20
NJCAA Postpones DI and DII Tournament -3/12/20
NCMC Suspending In-Person Classes -3/12/20

GENERAL COVID-19 INFORMATION

What is novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV)?

COVID-19 is an illness caused by a virus.  The coronaviruses are a large group of viruses that usually cause upper respiratory illness.

  • It is newly identified, so much is still unknown about it.
  • Two other human coronaviruses, MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV, have caused severe illness.

What is the risk?

The CDC considers this new virus a public health concern based on current information. However, the immediate health risk to the general US public is considered low at this time. The CDC and the World Health Organization are closely monitoring the situation and providing ongoing guidance.
Symptoms and transmission:

Symptoms may be flu-like, ranging from mild to serious, and include:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Difficulty breathing.

Person-to-person spread is occurring, although it’s unclear exactly how it is transmitted and how easily the virus spreads between people.

Treatment:

People infected with 2019-nCoV should receive supportive care to help relieve symptoms. Currently, there is no specific antiviral treatment recommended for 2019-nCoV infection. (source: CDC)

Prevention:

There is no vaccine to prevent this virus, and the CDC advises that the best way to prevent infection is to avoid being exposed to this virus.
Here are everyday actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory viruses:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Practice social distancing (6 feet).
  • Wear a mask in public settings and when around people outside of your household, especially when social distancing
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.